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"Moose" Johnston has figured out what wrong w Jacobs


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Analyst: Jacobs not using his best asset

 

Last Updated: 7:57 AM, September 30, 2009

 

Posted: 2:08 AM, September 30, 2009

On Saturday in Tampa, Daryl Johnston, affectionately known as “Moose” from his days playing fullback for the Cowboys, met Brandon Jacobs for the first time. Johnston, a FOX color analyst, got the chance for a sit-down with Jacobs at a production meeting and came away slightly in awe.<p> </p><br> “I said, ‘That can’t be a running back,’ “ Johnston told The Post<p> </p><br> yesterday. “He’s just thick everywhere. You can be 6-4 and 264 pounds and not be very intimidating. Brandon’s extremely intimidating.”<p> </p><br> GIANTS BLOG<p> </p><br> BEST AND WORST FROM WEEK 3<p> </p><br> The next day, Johnston and another former NFL player, Tony Siragusa, were critical on the air of the way Jacobs ran as the Giants plowed over the Buccaneers 24-0. Not that Jacobs was terrible by any means, but he just wasn’t, well, anywhere near intimidating.<p> </p><br> “He’s such a unique style of running back that I don’t think he’s using his best asset, the things that separate him,” Johnston said.<p> </p><br> Jacobs, in his first four NFL seasons averaged, 4.7 yards a carry, a hefty 5.0 yards the past two seasons after he became a starter with the retirement of Tiki Barber. He’s not close to that production in the first three games, all victories. He’s barely averaging 3.4 yards per rushing attempt. Even his 92 yards in Tampa can’t be considered a breakthrough, as he carried the ball 26 times.<p> </p><br> The most incriminating number of all thus far for Jacobs is that of his 58 rushing attempts, 32 of them have resulted in gains of two yards or less.<p> </p><br> “That’s very surprising,” Johnston said. “He’s too big and too physical to be able to be stopped for two yards or less that many times. That’s a guy who’s looking for the home run, a guy looking for that big play.”<p> </p><br> Instead, Jacobs needs to go back to being a singles hitter. He signed a four-year, $25 million contract ($13 million guaranteed) this past offseason. Big money can siphon the desire out of a player, but that’s not the case with Jacobs.<p> </p><br> “If anything, I see it the other way,” Johnston said. “I’ve got that big contract, now I’ve got to live up to it. I need to be ripping off 35-, 40-yard runs week after week. That’s not happening, and all of a sudden there’s that tendency to try to make something big when it’s not really there.”<p> </p><br> Johnston before the Giants mauled the Bucs sought out Carl Banks, the former Giants linebacker (and current radio announcer) who sees Jacobs every game. The two agreed Jacobs more often needs to “press the hole.”<p> </p><br> “He’s got a great group in front of him,” Johnston said. “Trust that aiming point and press that hole as opposed to all of a sudden out of your peripheral, [look at] what’s happening backside. If a play is designed to go to a certain spot stay on that track a little bit longer.”<p> </p><br> There are certain realities that Jacobs has to contend with that are foreign to normal-sized running backs. Defenders dive at his knees and ankles because they want no part of him up high. Johnston believes Jacobs has excellent feet for a big guy and has the ability to make a jump-cut to change direction.<p> </p><br> “But because he’s so big sometimes he has to come to more of a complete stop than what Ahmad [bradshaw] and some of the smaller guys can do,” he said. “That’s physics. The one thing you don’t want to see Brandon do is stop moving his feet. When he comes to the line of scrimmage and stops his legs then it’s, ‘OK, now I’m going to go get him before he has a chance to get started.’ “<p> </p><br> Jacobs needs to get what he can get without getting greedy.<p> </p><br> “Second-and-six is beautiful, especially with the way Eli [Manning] is playing,” Johnston said. “Second-and-six is a great place to be in.”<p> </p><br> Much better than the second-and-eight the Giants and Jacobs too often find themselves in.<p> </p><br> paul.schwartz@nypost.com<p> </p><br>

 

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headshotPaul Schwartz

 

On Saturday in Tampa, Daryl Johnston, affectionately known as “Moose” from his days playing fullback for the Cowboys, met Brandon Jacobs for the first time. Johnston, a FOX color analyst, got the chance for a sit-down with Jacobs at a production meeting and came away slightly in awe.

 

“I said, ‘That can’t be a running back,’ “ Johnston told The Post

 

yesterday. “He’s just thick everywhere. You can be 6-4 and 264 pounds and not be very intimidating. Brandon’s extremely intimidating.”

 

GIANTS BLOG

 

BEST AND WORST FROM WEEK 3

 

The next day, Johnston and another former NFL player, Tony Siragusa, were critical on the air of the way Jacobs ran as the Giants plowed over the Buccaneers 24-0. Not that Jacobs was terrible by any means, but he just wasn’t, well, anywhere near intimidating.

UPI

 

“He’s such a unique style of running back that I don’t think he’s using his best asset, the things that separate him,” Johnston said.

 

Jacobs, in his first four NFL seasons averaged, 4.7 yards a carry, a hefty 5.0 yards the past two seasons after he became a starter with the retirement of Tiki Barber. He’s not close to that production in the first three games, all victories. He’s barely averaging 3.4 yards per rushing attempt. Even his 92 yards in Tampa can’t be considered a breakthrough, as he carried the ball 26 times.

 

The most incriminating number of all thus far for Jacobs is that of his 58 rushing attempts, 32 of them have resulted in gains of two yards or less.

 

“That’s very surprising,” Johnston said. “He’s too big and too physical to be able to be stopped for two yards or less that many times. That’s a guy who’s looking for the home run, a guy looking for that big play.”

 

Instead, Jacobs needs to go back to being a singles hitter. He signed a four-year, $25 million contract ($13 million guaranteed) this past offseason. Big money can siphon the desire out of a player, but that’s not the case with Jacobs.

 

“If anything, I see it the other way,” Johnston said. “I’ve got that big contract, now I’ve got to live up to it. I need to be ripping off 35-, 40-yard runs week after week. That’s not happening, and all of a sudden there’s that tendency to try to make something big when it’s not really there.”

 

Johnston before the Giants mauled the Bucs sought out Carl Banks, the former Giants linebacker (and current radio announcer) who sees Jacobs every game. The two agreed Jacobs more often needs to “press the hole.”

 

“He’s got a great group in front of him,” Johnston said. “Trust that aiming point and press that hole as opposed to all of a sudden out of your peripheral, [look at] what’s happening backside. If a play is designed to go to a certain spot stay on that track a little bit longer.”

 

There are certain realities that Jacobs has to contend with that are foreign to normal-sized running backs. Defenders dive at his knees and ankles because they want no part of him up high. Johnston believes Jacobs has excellent feet for a big guy and has the ability to make a jump-cut to change direction.

 

“But because he’s so big sometimes he has to come to more of a complete stop than what Ahmad [bradshaw] and some of the smaller guys can do,” he said. “That’s physics. The one thing you don’t want to see Brandon do is stop moving his feet. When he comes to the line of scrimmage and stops his legs then it’s, ‘OK, now I’m going to go get him before he has a chance to get started.’ “

 

Jacobs needs to get what he can get without getting greedy.

 

“Second-and-six is beautiful, especially with the way Eli [Manning] is playing,” Johnston said. “Second-and-six is a great place to be in.”

 

Much better than the second-and-eight the Giants and Jacobs too often find themselves in.

 

paul.schwartz@nypost.com

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Moose and Banks might be correct. I hope they are, because that is correctable. I think there could be another problem. Jacobs has been hit in the knees quite a bit, has suffered knee injuries multiple times. Right now, defenders are going at his legs more than ever before. I'm worried that B-Jac is afraid to get hit down low and suffer another injury. If there's a fear of getting hit, than he has to get that fear out of him... a lot harder to do than just to stop looking for the homerun.

 

He has looked tentative at the line of scrimmage... he used to look for people to run over. Now he looks like he is trying to avoid them. I really hope it's not because he's afraid to get hit low now.

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Moose and Banks might be correct. I hope they are, because that is correctable. I think there could be another problem. Jacobs has been hit in the knees quite a bit, has suffered knee injuries multiple times. Right now, defenders are going at his legs more than ever before. I'm worried that B-Jac is afraid to get hit down low and suffer another injury. If there's a fear of getting hit, than he has to get that fear out of him... a lot harder to do than just to stop looking for the homerun.

 

He has looked tentative at the line of scrimmage... he used to look for people to run over. Now he looks like he is trying to avoid them. I really hope it's not because he's afraid to get hit low now.

 

I thought the same exact thing....he looks to be tiptoeing because he seems to think of himself as fragile....he's been letting arm tackles and little trip ups bring him down in the backfield....

 

Then again, another problem I've noticed is our run blocking....whereas Bradshaw can be contained in the backfield and still bust off a solid gain because of his elusiveness, Jacobs needs to get a head of steam going and the oline hasn't been allowing that for him.

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Moose and Banks might be correct. I hope they are, because that is correctable. I think there could be another problem. Jacobs has been hit in the knees quite a bit, has suffered knee injuries multiple times. Right now, defenders are going at his legs more than ever before. I'm worried that B-Jac is afraid to get hit down low and suffer another injury. If there's a fear of getting hit, than he has to get that fear out of him... a lot harder to do than just to stop looking for the homerun.

 

He has looked tentative at the line of scrimmage... he used to look for people to run over. Now he looks like he is trying to avoid them. I really hope it's not because he's afraid to get hit low now.

 

Yes, tentative is a good word for it....like he's trying to find holes, whereas in the past he used to just create them.

 

Fortunately, he's shown in the past what he can do, so it's something that can be corrected.

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i don't think there's anything wrong with him. The defense is more bunched up because we don't have a deep threat.

 

you dont????? hes hitting the hole after stopping dead.....same crappp ron dayne did

 

only tiki could accelerate after stopping......maybe bradsdhaw can

 

jacobs is far too heavy to be stopping and starting

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Moose and Banks might be correct. I hope they are, because that is correctable. I think there could be another problem. Jacobs has been hit in the knees quite a bit, has suffered knee injuries multiple times. Right now, defenders are going at his legs more than ever before. I'm worried that B-Jac is afraid to get hit down low and suffer another injury. If there's a fear of getting hit, than he has to get that fear out of him... a lot harder to do than just to stop looking for the homerun.

 

He has looked tentative at the line of scrimmage... he used to look for people to run over. Now he looks like he is trying to avoid them. I really hope it's not because he's afraid to get hit low now.

 

Well said, Jim. Jacobs does understandably fears serious injury from low hitters.

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you dont????? hes hitting the hole after stopping dead.....same crappp ron dayne did

 

only tiki could accelerate after stopping......maybe bradsdhaw can

 

jacobs is far too heavy to be stopping and starting

because there's no hole.

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The dog thinks everyone is missing the obvious...the fact that Jacobs was never really a superstar runner to begin with...

where in this thread did anyone call him a superstar? seems you're looking for any chance to push your tired agenda.

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it has to do with our not having a deep threat. teams are keying on the run still.

 

True to an extent which explains our relative success in the passing game (understatement). Give BJ credit for that too.

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True to an extent which explains our relative success in the passing game (understatement). Give BJ credit for that too.

that's the pint i was making= the giants are taking what the defense gives them. right now the opposition feels the running game is the 'devil they know'. this is a dynamic situation and you'll see jacobs bust a big day when it changes.

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that's the pint i was making= the giants are taking what the defense gives them. right now the opposition feels the running game is the 'devil they know'. this is a dynamic situation and you'll see jacobs bust a big day when it changes.

 

I'll give you two weeks. Make it happen. :)

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where in this thread did anyone call him a superstar? seems you're looking for any chance to push your tired agenda.

 

what agenda? the dog has been saying for two years that jacobs doesn't attack the line of scrimmage unless he has a gaping hole to run through...he doesn't run over players unless he is one on one with a d-back, he consistently gets stopped in short yardage situations, he can't carry the load for a full season, he can't create yardage as a running back...everyone is talking about his first few games as if any of this new. the only new thing is instead of everyone coming to his defense that he is a beast, now he is being focused on for all of this...he is a solid back, nothing more...

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what agenda? the dog has been saying for two years that jacobs doesn't attack the line of scrimmage unless he has a gaping hole to run through...he doesn't run over players unless he is one on one with a d-back, he consistently gets stopped in short yardage situations, he can't carry the load for a full season, he can't create yardage as a running back...everyone is talking about his first few games as if any of this new. the only new thing is instead of everyone coming to his defense that he is a beast, now he is being focused on for all of this...he is a solid back, nothing more...

 

 

he is not julius jones thats for sure. With Jacobs we will always need another back and thats ok

if you have jerry reese as your GM. All backs get hurt so its all moot any way.

Jacobs plays a very good role here and as the oline goes the running backs go.

 

Jacobs needs specific kind of lanes to run through otherwise he stops his momentum and

tries to shift and move to something else. As you said Dog we seen it before and it is nothing new.

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what agenda? the dog has been saying for two years that jacobs doesn't attack the line of scrimmage unless he has a gaping hole to run through...he doesn't run over players unless he is one on one with a d-back, he consistently gets stopped in short yardage situations, he can't carry the load for a full season, he can't create yardage as a running back...everyone is talking about his first few games as if any of this new. the only new thing is instead of everyone coming to his defense that he is a beast, now he is being focused on for all of this...he is a solid back, nothing more...

 

If thats what you've been saying, you haven't been paying attention.

 

Jacobs absolutely DESTROYED Brian Urlacher. In a preseason game no less. And thats just one of many, almost-weekly examples. Ask Marcus Washington.

 

Jacobs is only average at short yardage...he's too big to get through the smaller holes presented by a defense stacked at the line, and he needs a little more time to get up the speed to move the pile himself. He should line-up a couple yards further off the ball in those situations, ala Adrian Peterson.

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All preseason it's been "The Giants have no wide receivers...you beat them by stopping the running game." You also heard, "The running game isn't the same because Derrick Ward left, and he was a 1,000 yard rusher."

 

So why exactly is it so surprising that opponents are keying on and slowing the one known quantity of the Giant's offense from last year?

 

Shit, I hope Jacob's has his worst statistical season if that means the WRs and Bradshaw wind up winning us the SB.

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