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Giants sign Safety CC Brown


jranieli
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http://www.nj.com/giants/index.ssf/2009/03...their_four.html

 

New York Giants add their fourth defensive free agent: safety C.C. Brown.

by Mike Garafolo/The Star-Ledger

Wednesday March 04, 2009, 3:34 PM

Bill Kostroun/Associated PressThe Giants signed their fourth free agent this offseason Wednesday, and it was another defensive player, safety C.C. Brown, left.

4:14 p.m. UPDATE The Giants have also announced the signing of TE Lee Vickers. More on him and quotes on Brown in a few.

 

The Giants have added a free agent to all three levels of their defense: line, linebackers and now secondary.

 

The team announced it has signed safety C.C. Brown to an undisclosed contract. Brown's agent, Chad Wiestling, said it's a 1-year deal, though he didn't provide financial terms. The 26-year-old Brown was a starter all four seasons with the Texans. Last year, he played only three games before landing on injured reserve with a forearm injury.

 

Brown, a sixth-round pick in 2005, has been credited with 254 tackles, including a career-high 84 in 2007. He has three interceptions and 14 passes defensed.

 

Brown will likely compete with Michael Johnson and Kenny Phillips for a starting spot. James Butler, a starter for the past three seasons, is currently a free agent and appears very unlikely to return to the Giants.

 

MG

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*The Giants also announced the signing of Lee Vickers, a former college defensive end who moved to tight end when he entered the NFL.

 

Vickers, 6-6 and 279 pounds, has played eight NFL games with two starts, all with the 2007 Baltimore Ravens. He caught two passes for four yards. The Ravens waived Vickers on Aug. 31, 2008.

 

“He converted to tight end and he has good hands,” Coughlin said. “I think we can get some versatility out of him as a blocker and a short-range receiver, but also on special teams. He’s pretty good in the wedge.”

 

Vickers entered the NFL as a rookie free agent with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2006. He was waived on Sept. 3 and signed to the Philadelphia Eagles’ practice squad two weeks later. The Eagles released him on Sept. 18, 2007 and he joined Baltimore, first on the practice squad and then the active roster.

 

Vickers played defensive end for four seasons at North Alabama. He began his collegiate career as a pitcher at Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Ala., then transferred to North Alabama, where he was a walk-on quarterback. Vickers quickly moved to defensive end.

 

Vickers was a standout quarterback at Athens (Ala.) High School. He was born on March 13, 1981.

 

 

http://www.giants.com/news/headlines/story...?story_id=35818

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what is with these signings? Boley i like but WTF? and who the fuck is C.C Brown i guess i am repeating that question but lets say it again who the fuck in C.C Brown

 

We could've done much worse for S depth. 4 year starter and he was far from the worst player in that secondary. He might even win the starting job.

 

How good this deal is, depends on the money.

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what is with these signings? Boley i like but WTF? and who the fuck is C.C Brown i guess i am repeating that question but lets say it again who the fuck in C.C Brown

 

Evidently we need a back up safety.. it's a one year deal that came probably on the very cheap... depth people.

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Michael Johnson and Kenny Philips will most likely start, but in case one slips up I think its very good to have a veteran who has played in the league and is relatively young at the position. Decent signing.

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We idolize football players--we call them warriors, heroes, and more. And certainly, it takes a big man to play such a violent and taxing game.

 

But it takes an even bigger man to serve their country, and to do it with the full knowledge that their playing career can be cut short at a moment's notice.

 

C.C. Brown is that bigger man.

 

I first came across his story when I was writing a Veterans Day article profiling different veterans currently in the NFL.

 

Brown joined the Mississippi National Guard straight out of high school, since he wasn't sure if he was going to get a chance to play college ball (he wasn't offered a scholarship anywhere), and the Army seemed like the only chance he would have to escape a rough childhood and desperately poor hometown.

 

After his enlistment, his life seemed to take a turn for the better, though not in the way I'm sure he was expecting: he enrolled in community college, and eventually transferred to Louisiana-Lafayette, where he was a star.

 

Just before the Combine after his senior year of college, hundreds of members of his unit were deployed to Afghanistan. Brown was not among them, but it seemed inevitable that he would go. As a result, the NFL did not invite him to the Combine, and his draft stock plummeted, as teams feared that he would be called into service at any time.

 

As it turns out, he was never called up, but the chance was there up until 2007, by which time he was a regular with the Texans. The whole time, he was cognizant that his NFL life could be gone instantaneously, but he didn't have a problem with it: if he was called into duty, he would serve.

 

Not, it's not quite Pat Tillman giving up everything to join the Rangers. But it doesn't have to be: Brown's continued service and dedication is something to be admired.

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We idolize football players--we call them warriors, heroes, and more. And certainly, it takes a big man to play such a violent and taxing game.

 

But it takes an even bigger man to serve their country, and to do it with the full knowledge that their playing career can be cut short at a moment's notice.

 

C.C. Brown is that bigger man.

 

I first came across his story when I was writing a Veterans Day article profiling different veterans currently in the NFL.

 

Brown joined the Mississippi National Guard straight out of high school, since he wasn't sure if he was going to get a chance to play college ball (he wasn't offered a scholarship anywhere), and the Army seemed like the only chance he would have to escape a rough childhood and desperately poor hometown.

 

After his enlistment, his life seemed to take a turn for the better, though not in the way I'm sure he was expecting: he enrolled in community college, and eventually transferred to Louisiana-Lafayette, where he was a star.

 

Just before the Combine after his senior year of college, hundreds of members of his unit were deployed to Afghanistan. Brown was not among them, but it seemed inevitable that he would go. As a result, the NFL did not invite him to the Combine, and his draft stock plummeted, as teams feared that he would be called into service at any time.

 

As it turns out, he was never called up, but the chance was there up until 2007, by which time he was a regular with the Texans. The whole time, he was cognizant that his NFL life could be gone instantaneously, but he didn't have a problem with it: if he was called into duty, he would serve.

 

Not, it's not quite Pat Tillman giving up everything to join the Rangers. But it doesn't have to be: Brown's continued service and dedication is something to be admired.

 

 

Hey coach... can't play in the Eagles game this weekend... it's my drill weekend, sorry! Here's my schedule of upcoming drills plus my annual training! :P

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