Jump to content
SportsWrath

Read between the lines of this article...


Run With 81
 Share

Recommended Posts

Now we all know the (Good) local beat reporters know the extent of the Giants injuries....the problem is if they write about it, all's they'll ever get from the team again would be who missed throwing thier coffee cup into the trash bin... :P

 

So they shut up....but if ya read between the lines here & maybe I over exaggeratin here... but see section highlighted in red....Never ONCE heard any mention of broken hips... :cwy:

 

It's (Ah achem) Painfully obvious who they're talking about with the mentioning of "Torn Pecs" Carlos, Pulled "Hammys & Muscles & QUADS" Moss, Madison, Concussions....But "BROKEN HIPS" Not in the last 3 years have I heard about ANY PLAYER on the giants having a broken hip....Unless they referring to OSI... :unsure: in a round about way!!! Why use those exact words....Why even sayt something like that???

 

 

 

They can feel Giant pain

 

Experts prescribe Big Blue flex time

 

BY RALPH VACCHIANO

DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

 

 

From his spot in the tunnel behind the end zone, Ernie Accorsi has seen the pain in the faces of every one of his injured players this season. They walk or get carried right past him as they head for the trainers' room, and the GM always tries to look into their eyes.

"Usually they'll reassure you," Accorsi says. "But you're around long enough that you can look at a guy's face and you just know its trouble."

 

In the last four seasons, Accorsi and the Giants have seen more injury trouble than they ever could've imagined. They have placed 42 players on season-ending injured reserve since the start of the 2003 season - many of them key players. And that doesn't include another dozen who could have been placed on IR, and dozens more who have missed multiple games. An amazing 30 of those actually on the injured reserve list have come in Tom Coughlin's 2 ½ seasons, including four more (two of them starters) already this year.

 

It was that kind of barrage of injuries that ruined Jim Fassel's final season (12 players on IR, a 4-12 record) and decimated the Giants late in 2005 (nine on IR, not including injured linebacker Antonio Pierce, and a first-round shutout loss in the playoffs).

 

And with two defensive ends, two linebackers, a cornerback, a receiver and a left tackle currently out of their starting lineup, injuries are threatening to ruin what they hoped would be a Super Bowl run this year, too. "It's like being in a fight," Accorsi says, "and you just keep getting hit."

 

That wasn't supposed to happen once Coughlin took over on Jan. 7, 2004. In his bold and forceful State of the Giants address to the media that day, he famously said injuries were "a cancer, let's face it. It's something that has to be corrected. It's a mental thing, I believe, as much as anything else."

 

The implication was that he would fix what Fassel couldn't, and that maybe the Giants' players weren't tough enough to play through pain.

 

Then, in Coughlin's first season at the helm, he placed 17 players on IR. Five more weren't healthy enough to play in the final game of the year.

 

It's been enough to make even some of the Giants wonder what's going on at Giants Stadium. Why can't they stay healthy? Is it just bad luck? Or are the coaches, athletic trainers and medical staff doing something wrong?

 

"I really think that you've got to look yourself in the mirror if you're the Giants and say 'Hey, we've got issues here,'" says Dr. Elton Strauss, the chief of orthopedic trauma and adult reconstruction at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. "It's not just in this season."

 

Dr. Strauss, whose sports experience includes working with pro tennis players at the U.S. Open, is aware of the number and variety of injuries the Giants have had and they are "multi-factoral".

 

He blamed some of them - most notably Michael Strahan's Lisfranc foot sprain - on the FieldTurf surface at Giants Stadium. And he chalked some up to the ferocity of the contact in football. "Though not that many guys get hurt by getting hit by another guy," he says. "It's usually something stupid."

 

The biggest factor, according to Dr. Strauss, is likely the Giants' intense strength and conditioning program. He believes there is probably too much weight lifting, with not enough time off in between sessions. The players, he says "are so big and strong with their muscles, that their muscles don't have a chance to recover."

 

"It's six months of constant playing, constant weight room," Dr. Strauss adds. "And then it's probably another five months of weight-room stuff. I think these muscles get too stiff, they just get too damn big, and they're just not flexible enough."

 

That, of course, has been a growing problem for the NFL in this era of supplements - both legal and illegal - as players get bigger and more muscle-bound every year. The NFL insists it has a strong drug testing program and that illegal performance enhancers aren't a problem. But Dr. Strauss says even the legal ones the NFL doesn't test for - including some as mundane as caffeine, which can dilute a body's water content - that can lead to injury problems, too.

 

"Who knows what supplements these guys are taking that are legal?" he says. "There are a lot of things you can't test for and everybody will take things to get a competitive edge."

 

Jerry Palmieri, the Giants' strength and conditioning coach, was not available to discuss his strength programs or any supplements his players might be taking because Coughlin does not let his assistants talk to the media. Nor would the Giants make Ronnie Barnes, the Giants' VP of medical services, available, meaning that neither could address Dr. Strauss' recommendation of "more yoga and more pilates" in the Giants' training program.

 

"I know that sounds like girly type of stuff," Dr. Strauss says. "But it's been proven. Something like that to try to get them a little more flexible might save them a hamstring or some other injury."

 

Several Giants, however, are known to be involved in yoga and other flexibility-heavy programs. Amani Toomer is a yoga freak, yet that didn't prevent him from tearing the ACL in his right knee. And Luke Petitgout's extensive martial arts training during the offseason was of no help to him when another player rolled up the back of his now-fractured left leg.

 

Al Green, a member of the National Athletic Trainers Association Hall of Fame who currently serves as the head trainer and GM of the Lakeland Thunderbolts of the American Indoor Football Association, agrees with the need for more flexibility in any team's training program. But he also says when it comes to injuries, sometimes there's just nothing a team can do.

 

"Part of it is a run of bad luck," says Green, who has also worked at the universities of Michigan and Kentucky. "You have good years and bad years, with absolutely no rhyme or reason. Sometimes you just unfortunately have those years."

 

That's how the Giants see the issue, too. They have researched their training program, equipment, practice routines, and their field, and they've made changes to their routines that they thought might help. Yet a parade of players still heads to the trainers' room with concussions, torn ligaments in knees and ankles, broken bones, torn pecs, fractured hips, torn groins, fractured backs and pulled hamstrings and quads.

 

"They're all over the place," Accorsi says. "If they were muscle tears, you'd say there's something wrong with the way we're stretching, or whatever. If it was all backs, then maybe it was something in the way we're lifting. But you're talking Lisfranc to a groin tear to a broken leg to a knee. And you're not talking about just on our field. It's on different fields.

 

"It's not like we're just putting our head in the sand. We've looked at it and studied it and talked about it. We have a tremendous medical staff and absolutely the best trainer in the business. But there's no thread to it. There's just no pattern."

 

So what about Coughlin's original proclamation, that this injury "cancer" is "mental as much as anything else"? Was that just an unfortunate choice of words - he backtracked when he was reminded of the quote on Monday, saying "That's not the case here" - or did he have a point?

 

"Lombardi used to say that there's a difference between being hurt and being injured," Accorsi says. "The minor hurts, yeah a lot of those are mental. But not these things."

 

"When you're hurt, you're hurt," Strahan adds. "The mental part of it, I don't know what that is. A lot of the things we've had over the last three years you just can't play with."

 

Or, as Green puts it, "It's hard to mentally have a broken leg." ;)

 

"Any good sports psychologist will tell you that if the person is upbeat, has a positive attitude, it may prevent some injuries," Green adds. "If you don't want to be there that day, you're not alert to what's going on, then you may be making the wrong step to where you cause that strain or sprain.

 

"But there is no question, your No. 1 injury sport is football. Sometimes it amazes me dealing with a lot of football coaches that they're surprised when people get hurt. How come we're having injuries? Uh, we're playing football. Injuries are just a part of the game."

 

Originally published on November 16, 2006

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now we all know the (Good) local beat reporters know the extent of the Giants injuries....the problem is if they write about it, all's they'll ever get from the team again would be who missed throwing thier coffee cup into the trash bin... :P

 

So they shut up....but if ya read between the lines here & maybe I over exaggeratin here... but see section highlighted in red....Never ONCE heard any mention of broken hips... :cwy:

 

It's (Ah achem) Painfully obvious who they're talking about with the mentioning of "Torn Pecs" Carlos, Pulled "Hammys & Muscles & QUADS" Moss, Madison, Concussions....But "BROKEN HIPS" Not in the last 3 years have I heard about ANY PLAYER on the giants having a broken hip....Unless they referring to OSI... :unsure: in a round about way!!! Why use those exact words....Why even sayt something like that???

They can feel Giant pain

 

Experts prescribe Big Blue flex time

 

BY RALPH VACCHIANO

DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

 

 

From his spot in the tunnel behind the end zone, Ernie Accorsi has seen the pain in the faces of every one of his injured players this season. They walk or get carried right past him as they head for the trainers' room, and the GM always tries to look into their eyes.

"Usually they'll reassure you," Accorsi says. "But you're around long enough that you can look at a guy's face and you just know its trouble."

 

In the last four seasons, Accorsi and the Giants have seen more injury trouble than they ever could've imagined. They have placed 42 players on season-ending injured reserve since the start of the 2003 season - many of them key players. And that doesn't include another dozen who could have been placed on IR, and dozens more who have missed multiple games. An amazing 30 of those actually on the injured reserve list have come in Tom Coughlin's 2 � seasons, including four more (two of them starters) already this year.

 

It was that kind of barrage of injuries that ruined Jim Fassel's final season (12 players on IR, a 4-12 record) and decimated the Giants late in 2005 (nine on IR, not including injured linebacker Antonio Pierce, and a first-round shutout loss in the playoffs).

 

And with two defensive ends, two linebackers, a cornerback, a receiver and a left tackle currently out of their starting lineup, injuries are threatening to ruin what they hoped would be a Super Bowl run this year, too. "It's like being in a fight," Accorsi says, "and you just keep getting hit."

 

That wasn't supposed to happen once Coughlin took over on Jan. 7, 2004. In his bold and forceful State of the Giants address to the media that day, he famously said injuries were "a cancer, let's face it. It's something that has to be corrected. It's a mental thing, I believe, as much as anything else."

 

The implication was that he would fix what Fassel couldn't, and that maybe the Giants' players weren't tough enough to play through pain.

 

Then, in Coughlin's first season at the helm, he placed 17 players on IR. Five more weren't healthy enough to play in the final game of the year.

 

It's been enough to make even some of the Giants wonder what's going on at Giants Stadium. Why can't they stay healthy? Is it just bad luck? Or are the coaches, athletic trainers and medical staff doing something wrong?

 

"I really think that you've got to look yourself in the mirror if you're the Giants and say 'Hey, we've got issues here,'" says Dr. Elton Strauss, the chief of orthopedic trauma and adult reconstruction at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. "It's not just in this season."

 

Dr. Strauss, whose sports experience includes working with pro tennis players at the U.S. Open, is aware of the number and variety of injuries the Giants have had and they are "multi-factoral".

 

He blamed some of them - most notably Michael Strahan's Lisfranc foot sprain - on the FieldTurf surface at Giants Stadium. And he chalked some up to the ferocity of the contact in football. "Though not that many guys get hurt by getting hit by another guy," he says. "It's usually something stupid."

 

The biggest factor, according to Dr. Strauss, is likely the Giants' intense strength and conditioning program. He believes there is probably too much weight lifting, with not enough time off in between sessions. The players, he says "are so big and strong with their muscles, that their muscles don't have a chance to recover."

 

"It's six months of constant playing, constant weight room," Dr. Strauss adds. "And then it's probably another five months of weight-room stuff. I think these muscles get too stiff, they just get too damn big, and they're just not flexible enough."

 

That, of course, has been a growing problem for the NFL in this era of supplements - both legal and illegal - as players get bigger and more muscle-bound every year. The NFL insists it has a strong drug testing program and that illegal performance enhancers aren't a problem. But Dr. Strauss says even the legal ones the NFL doesn't test for - including some as mundane as caffeine, which can dilute a body's water content - that can lead to injury problems, too.

 

"Who knows what supplements these guys are taking that are legal?" he says. "There are a lot of things you can't test for and everybody will take things to get a competitive edge."

 

Jerry Palmieri, the Giants' strength and conditioning coach, was not available to discuss his strength programs or any supplements his players might be taking because Coughlin does not let his assistants talk to the media. Nor would the Giants make Ronnie Barnes, the Giants' VP of medical services, available, meaning that neither could address Dr. Strauss' recommendation of "more yoga and more pilates" in the Giants' training program.

 

"I know that sounds like girly type of stuff," Dr. Strauss says. "But it's been proven. Something like that to try to get them a little more flexible might save them a hamstring or some other injury."

 

Several Giants, however, are known to be involved in yoga and other flexibility-heavy programs. Amani Toomer is a yoga freak, yet that didn't prevent him from tearing the ACL in his right knee. And Luke Petitgout's extensive martial arts training during the offseason was of no help to him when another player rolled up the back of his now-fractured left leg.

 

Al Green, a member of the National Athletic Trainers Association Hall of Fame who currently serves as the head trainer and GM of the Lakeland Thunderbolts of the American Indoor Football Association, agrees with the need for more flexibility in any team's training program. But he also says when it comes to injuries, sometimes there's just nothing a team can do.

 

"Part of it is a run of bad luck," says Green, who has also worked at the universities of Michigan and Kentucky. "You have good years and bad years, with absolutely no rhyme or reason. Sometimes you just unfortunately have those years."

 

That's how the Giants see the issue, too. They have researched their training program, equipment, practice routines, and their field, and they've made changes to their routines that they thought might help. Yet a parade of players still heads to the trainers' room with concussions, torn ligaments in knees and ankles, broken bones, torn pecs, fractured hips, torn groins, fractured backs and pulled hamstrings and quads.

 

"They're all over the place," Accorsi says. "If they were muscle tears, you'd say there's something wrong with the way we're stretching, or whatever. If it was all backs, then maybe it was something in the way we're lifting. But you're talking Lisfranc to a groin tear to a broken leg to a knee. And you're not talking about just on our field. It's on different fields.

 

"It's not like we're just putting our head in the sand. We've looked at it and studied it and talked about it. We have a tremendous medical staff and absolutely the best trainer in the business. But there's no thread to it. There's just no pattern."

 

So what about Coughlin's original proclamation, that this injury "cancer" is "mental as much as anything else"? Was that just an unfortunate choice of words - he backtracked when he was reminded of the quote on Monday, saying "That's not the case here" - or did he have a point?

 

"Lombardi used to say that there's a difference between being hurt and being injured," Accorsi says. "The minor hurts, yeah a lot of those are mental. But not these things."

 

"When you're hurt, you're hurt," Strahan adds. "The mental part of it, I don't know what that is. A lot of the things we've had over the last three years you just can't play with."

 

Or, as Green puts it, "It's hard to mentally have a broken leg." ;)

 

"Any good sports psychologist will tell you that if the person is upbeat, has a positive attitude, it may prevent some injuries," Green adds. "If you don't want to be there that day, you're not alert to what's going on, then you may be making the wrong step to where you cause that strain or sprain.

 

"But there is no question, your No. 1 injury sport is football. Sometimes it amazes me dealing with a lot of football coaches that they're surprised when people get hurt. How come we're having injuries? Uh, we're playing football. Injuries are just a part of the game."

 

Originally published on November 16, 2006

RIP Giants of '07 :(

we are on the verge of having one of the best teams on paper to get destroyed by injuries

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A pair of girls I saw at a club few years back. Better resolution and you would really need to loosen your pants.

the one on the right looks familiar...

 

I would be able to tell more so if you had a shot of her on her knees looking up at me..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the one on the right looks familiar...

 

I would be able to tell more so if you had a shot of her on her knees looking up at me..

Look into my eyes ....here it comes....baby....don't move.....thats right look at me....don't stop....YEARRRGH!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...