Jump to content
SportsWrath

A look at our more unknown Linebackers


Lughead
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am going to post some videos of our or our young Linebacker corps . and some Line backers that you don't see on the field much. maybe we can get a better feel of who will be starting and how we will do at the Linebacker level. Remember last years Wide Receiver corps was in question and this years Linebacker corps are now in question. Well lets have a look at what we have in store for 2010. I will have to add more videos in the next post because we can only do 4 Yahoo videos per post.

 

Jonathan Goff

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hV2DBTEP4kw

 

 

 

Kenny Ingram

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaW4YZH88bw

 

 

Bryan Kehl

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNHpNfOChes

 

Adrian Tracy

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViCrwMUTZCg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LP7VXULNNlM

 

Giants getting 'complete player' in rookie linebacker Phillip Dillard

By Mike Garafolo/The Star-Ledger

Tyrone Lynn’s nickname is “Joe Proverb,” so you know the guy likes a good quote. And one of his favorites is a mantra his adopted son Phillip Dillard often repeats.

 

“When the receiver drags across the middle, they have to pay tolls,” Dillard says, “and most of them can’t afford it.”

 

There’s plenty to be said about Phillip Dillard the man, but what about Phillip Dillard the football player? What do the fourth-round pick’s former position coach and his father believe he’s capable of bringing to the Giants?

 

Aside from a capability and a desire to hit the man with the ball – and even the ones without it – they believe he’s a smart, agile player who can cover the entire second level of the defense.

 

“His movement in the box, I haven’t seen anybody move like that guy,” said Mike Ekeler, Nebraska’s linebackers coach. “From tackle to tackle, the way he moves, it’s like he’s floating on air. He’s got unbelievable instincts. He’s pretty special. And he’s gotten so much better playing in space. I look at him being a complete player.”

 

Ekeler said Dillard’s movement is “natural, he flows effortlessly.” And Ekeler isn’t the only one to note Dillard’s knack for keeping his shoulders parallel to the line of scrimmage while moving side to side. Many scouts have also noted his sound technique.

 

“Shoulders over toes, always in balance and ready to take on a block,” Ekeler said. “A great linebacker never has their shoulders parallel to the sidelines, only the line of scrimmage so you can take on blocks. If you turn and the ball cuts across, you can’t plant your foot, turn your shoulders and come back. He always has his shoulders square, and he’s getting so much better taking on blocks and defeating the block.”

 

Ekeler recalled Dillard’s squared shoulders allowing him to make a big play against Arizona on an end around. The shifty ball carrier had lots of open field to work with and only one defender to beat. That defender was Dillard, and beat him he did not.

 

“The guy’s in full speed coming around the egde,” Ekeler said. “He hits him under the chin and drives him back 10 yards like he met him in the hole.”

 

Added Lynn, “Kids these days don’t understand the term phone booth but it was like he hit a guy in a phone booth. He just uncoiled his hips and destroyed him.”

 

Lynn loves watching Dillard make a big hit, such as a shot he delivered on to Kansas State’s Daniel Thomas on a third-and-1. Dillard, a film junkie by all accounts, could tell the guard was going to pull and that the play was coming through the vacated hole. So he stepped up and delivered a blow to the 6-2, 227-pound Thomas that left even the announcer speechless.

 

There was another time against Texas Tech Dillard knew a lineman was going to pull toward his side. This time, it was the guard, not the ball carrier, who received the shot from Dillard that forced the play back inside.

 

Lynn found himself chuckling after the play.

 

“I could see Phil talking trash because he hates linemen anyway,” Lynn said. “And he forced the play right back to (Ndamukong) Suh. That’s Phil – somebody’s going to get hit. He doesn’t care if it’s a lineman or whatever.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LP7VXULNNlM

 

Giants getting 'complete player' in rookie linebacker Phillip Dillard

By Mike Garafolo/The Star-Ledger

Tyrone Lynn’s nickname is “Joe Proverb,” so you know the guy likes a good quote. And one of his favorites is a mantra his adopted son Phillip Dillard often repeats.

 

“When the receiver drags across the middle, they have to pay tolls,” Dillard says, “and most of them can’t afford it.”

 

There’s plenty to be said about Phillip Dillard the man, but what about Phillip Dillard the football player? What do the fourth-round pick’s former position coach and his father believe he’s capable of bringing to the Giants?

 

Aside from a capability and a desire to hit the man with the ball – and even the ones without it – they believe he’s a smart, agile player who can cover the entire second level of the defense.

 

“His movement in the box, I haven’t seen anybody move like that guy,” said Mike Ekeler, Nebraska’s linebackers coach. “From tackle to tackle, the way he moves, it’s like he’s floating on air. He’s got unbelievable instincts. He’s pretty special. And he’s gotten so much better playing in space. I look at him being a complete player.”

 

Ekeler said Dillard’s movement is “natural, he flows effortlessly.” And Ekeler isn’t the only one to note Dillard’s knack for keeping his shoulders parallel to the line of scrimmage while moving side to side. Many scouts have also noted his sound technique.

 

“Shoulders over toes, always in balance and ready to take on a block,” Ekeler said. “A great linebacker never has their shoulders parallel to the sidelines, only the line of scrimmage so you can take on blocks. If you turn and the ball cuts across, you can’t plant your foot, turn your shoulders and come back. He always has his shoulders square, and he’s getting so much better taking on blocks and defeating the block.”

 

Ekeler recalled Dillard’s squared shoulders allowing him to make a big play against Arizona on an end around. The shifty ball carrier had lots of open field to work with and only one defender to beat. That defender was Dillard, and beat him he did not.

 

“The guy’s in full speed coming around the egde,” Ekeler said. “He hits him under the chin and drives him back 10 yards like he met him in the hole.”

 

Added Lynn, “Kids these days don’t understand the term phone booth but it was like he hit a guy in a phone booth. He just uncoiled his hips and destroyed him.”

 

Lynn loves watching Dillard make a big hit, such as a shot he delivered on to Kansas State’s Daniel Thomas on a third-and-1. Dillard, a film junkie by all accounts, could tell the guard was going to pull and that the play was coming through the vacated hole. So he stepped up and delivered a blow to the 6-2, 227-pound Thomas that left even the announcer speechless.

 

There was another time against Texas Tech Dillard knew a lineman was going to pull toward his side. This time, it was the guard, not the ball carrier, who received the shot from Dillard that forced the play back inside.

 

Lynn found himself chuckling after the play.

 

“I could see Phil talking trash because he hates linemen anyway,” Lynn said. “And he forced the play right back to (Ndamukong) Suh. That’s Phil – somebody’s going to get hit. He doesn’t care if it’s a lineman or whatever.”

 

 

Of all the picks in the draft, this is where I really hope Reese has struck gold.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LBer LEE Campbell turns heads at Giants Mini camp

 

 

 

LB Lee Campbell Turning Heads as a Giant

Posted by Andrew Ilnicki on May 3rd, 2010 in Main Recently signed Minnesota rookie MLB Lee Campbell has caught the attention of Craig Santucci from Giants Football Blog, whose excellent write up then caught my attention. See how that works? [via]

 

When is the last time you heard anyone describe a New York Giants middle linebacker as rugged or hard-nosed?Monday, the Giants signed undrafted rookie free agent LB Lee Campbell out of Minnesota. The former Gopher has some impressive stats; Campbell led the Golden Gophers in tackles for three straight years, including a fantastic senior year when the middle linebacker racked up 119.

 

The underrated Campbell's 119 tackles last fall were the third-most in the Big Ten, and he was an all-conference honorable mention. That's a lot of tackles for college ball.

 

Campbell started his career as a defensive end but made the switch to middle linebacker in 2008 and never looked back. The newest Giants linebacker is also a very big guy who stands 6?3?, 246 pounds. He just might surprise some people this upcoming season.

 

Described as a "downhill" linebacker, the kid might actually fit in with the lunch pail type of old school approach. His college starting streak also showcases his durability as Campbell has started 23 games on the Gophers defense over the past two seasons—the most of any current Minnesota defensive player.

 

Some NFL scouts seem to have stayed away due to his lack of range, but at 119 tackles, it truly does not seem to be a problem for the newest Giant. As run-stopping linebackers go, Campbell is right there with
Pat Angerer
, who was drafted by the Colts as the complete package.

 

"I got to play Big Ten football for four years," Campbell said of his Gopher career. "It's definitely hard-hitting football. It has prepared me. I played with elite athletes week-in and week-out. I'm ready for the next level and I'm excited."

 

I am sure the kid can make the team and with some hard work he can push Jonathan Goff to be a better player.

 

What more can I possibly add to that? I suppose if Campbell doesn't impress over the summer, there are 4-5 other guys competing for the same position… so what do the Giants have to lose here? I think this makes up for missing out on the McClain train…. simply because the Giants were able to get a couple of freaks at DE and DT and still sign a star LB.

 

Excellent signing, excellent write up. Overall… simply excellent.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyAiGRFsthA

 

 

not one highlight I could find

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder why Lee didn't get drafted? Normally when someone puts stats like that, a teams gives him a chance. Character issues?

I agree - but from everything I've read, he has no character issues whatsoever, other than he likes hitting opposing football players. He must've just fallen through the cracks or something. It was a very deep draft this year and after the first 3 or so rounds, teams start going after needs more than BPA.

 

I've been doing some research on this guy and the more I read, the more I love this guy....here's what I find (the last two articles are very telling):

 

(from cdsdraft)

"As a junior, Lee was moved from defensive end to middle linebacker and started 12 of 13 games and finished the regular season as the teams leading tackler with 80 total tackles on the year. He also recorded four sacks, 5.5 tackles for losses, two interceptions, three fumble recoveries, a forced fumble and a pass breakup. He made his senior season his best this year, tallying 67 solo tackles, 47 assists, 9.5 TFLs, .5 sacks, 1 interception, 5 PBUs, 1 QBH, 1 FR, 2 BKs".

 

Strengths

 

Downhill thumper at MLB who has been more productive each year. Pro size and speed. Solid at the POA and tackles well. Plays fast. Penetrates gaps and makes plays in the backfield. Has experience at DE and can step up and play a 2-pt. DE in some sets. Recoils from initial contact with blockers and reloads rather than staying wired. Aware in coverage

.

Weaknesses

 

A little bit straight-linish. Not real smooth dropping and doesn't have great COD and lateral agility. Not an elite run stuffer, or blitzer, or coverage guy. Looks like a converted defensive lineman at times. If used as a DE, he doesn't always finish that well when rushing the QB.

 

Projection

 

A poor man's Mike Vrable who can do a lot of things pretty well. Looks like a 3rd rounder based on his body of work with the Gophers, but agility workouts in the post-season could move him a full round in either direction.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

On his pro day at Minnesota, LB Lee Campbell ran the 40-yard dash in 4.79 seconds, the short shuttle in 4.20 seconds and the three-cone drill in 7.11 seconds. He measured a 34-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 1/2 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press. (from kffl)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Minnesota Star Has the Grit and the Goods To Be a Top MLB

 

When is the last time you heard anyone describe a New York Giants middle linebacker as rugged or hard-nosed?

 

Monday, the Giants signed undrafted rookie free agent LB Lee Campbell out of Minnesota. The former Gopher has some impressive stats; Campbell led the Golden Gophers in tackles for three straight years, including a fantastic senior year when the middle linebacker racked up 119.

 

The underrated Campbells 119 tackles last fall were the third-most in the Big Ten, and he was an all-conference honorable mention. Thats a lot of tackles for college ball.

 

Campbell started his career as a defensive end but made the switch to middle linebacker in 2008 and never looked back. The newest Giants linebacker is also a very big guy who stands 6′3″, 246 pounds. He just might surprise some people this upcoming season.

 

Described as a downhill linebacker, the kid might actually fit in with the lunch pail type of old school approach. His college starting streak also showcases his durability as Campbell has started 23 games on the Gophers defense over the past two seasonsthe most of any current Minnesota defensive player.

 

Some NFL scouts seem to have stayed away due to his lack of range, but at 119 tackles, it truly does not seem to be a problem for the newest Giant. As run-stopping linebackers go, Campbell is right there with Pat Angerer , who was drafted by the Colts as the complete package.

 

I got to play Big Ten football for four years, Campbell said of his Gopher career. Its definitely hard-hitting football. It has prepared me. I played with elite athletes week-in and week-out. Im ready for the next level and Im excited.

 

I am sure the kid can make the team and with some hard work he can push Jonathan Goff to be a better player.

--------------------------------------------------------

 

Us Lee Campbell in the Middle of Everything

Minnesota Star Tribune - September 3, 2009

 

A drizzle was turning into a downpour early Friday morning as the Gophers defense prepared to run onto the field for the final practice of training camp.

 

Simoni Lawrence whooped it up, jumped up and down. The elements, he said, you have to love it. Fellow linebacker Lee Campbell turned and grinned at his teammate. Wet field? Watch out.

 

"I'm going to tackle everybody today," he promised. "Right into the ground."

 

Three weeks of camp and Campbell can still hardly wait to get on the field for a practice. Rain? Bring it on. Hitting? Can't wait. Football? Is there anything else?

 

"Lee is all-out in whatever he does," nose tackle Eric Small said. ''He does not hold back, and that is not a bad thing."

 

On Saturday, the Gophers will begin their season at Syracuse. Go figure: The first season back in the elements on campus begins with a trip to the Carrier Dome.

 

It doesn't matter to Campbell. It's football.

 

He is the Gophers' middle linebacker. The signal-caller, the leader, some say the heart of a group that, with several starters back, is looking to take another step up the statistical ladder.

 

Much of that will depend on Campbell, a Florida kid who came north specifically because he liked the hard-nosed style of play favored by so many Big Ten Conference teams. OK, so that was before the spread offense started spreading, but so what?

 

Campbell returns having started 23 games the past two seasons, more than any other Gophers defender. Moved from defensive end back to linebacker during camp last season (something Campbell calls one of the best days of his life) he plugged up the middle, bringing a downhill style and a nose for the big play.

 

Campbell led the Gophers with 80 tackles, despite suffering a badly sprained ankle against Wisconsin that hampered him against Iowa and again in the Insight Bowl. He had 5 1/2 tackles for loss, including four sacks. He intercepted two passes, forced a fumble and recovered three.

 

"I play football because that's what I know how to do," Campbell said. "I love hitting people. I love hitting people hard, making tackles, hearing the cheering of the crowd. I like being known as a football player. You can't compare it to anything else, at least for me. I'd choose this over anything in the world."

 

Straight from central casting

 

Think middle linebacker. What comes to mind?

 

An intense stare that falls just this side of disturbing? Check. Square jaw and crew cut? Check. Campbell is a 6-3, 246-pound throwback.

 

"He is old school," Lawrence said. "He's a [Dick] Butkus kind of guy."

 

Sometimes before a game, Campbell will get so jacked up he will start headbutting teammates; Lawrence has had to ask his co-captain to relax.

 

"He'll be like, 'Come on, let's go!'" Lawrence said. "And I'll be like, 'I don't need a concussion before the game!'"

 

As a senior at Gulf Coast High School in Naples, Fla., Campbell went undefeated and won the state wrestling title at 215 pounds. His dad, Jack, had been an All-America at Clarion College in Pennsylvania and had hoped his son would wrestle in college. But for Campbell, it was all football.

 

"I love everything about it," he said. "I love getting nicked up, I love having bruises. Football is changing, but I love it when a team lines up in an I-formation and says, 'Let's see who's tougher.'"

 

Campbell might have an old-school approach, but he has new-age skills. He's fast enough to get from sideline to sideline and athletic enough to drop back in pass defense. Sure, there is nothing better than going through a center on the way to a running back. But his big plays last year show his game is well-rounded. He might not wrestle these days, but he takes many of the skills he learned on the mat onto the field.

-------------------------------------------------------

 

Gulf Coast High School Grad and University of Minnesota Standout Looks to Continue His Football Career

NaplesTimes - April 8, 2010

 

Two minutes with Gulf Coast High grad Lee Campbell leaves no doubt the man is a linebacker.

 

With a buzz cut, lantern jaw and stone-busting set of shoulders, Lee definitely has the look down.

 

A three-year starter for Minnesota, leading the Golden Gophers in tackles last season, Lee has the rugged Big-Ten pedigree prized by NFL teams, one of which Campbell soon expects to be chosen by in the leagues draft on April 22.

 

Toward the end of a daily four-hour workout at Velocity Sports Performance in Golden Gate, the 6-foot-2, 250-pounder presses 90-pound dumbbells as if theyre slices of sandwich bread. All the more on furthering his plans on devouring ball carriers and blockers for the next 10 years.

 

I look at football as a battle, Campbell said. Im out there to beat the guy across from me. I love hitting. I love imposing my will on people.

 

I love to compete. I love to do it in front of fans. And whatever organization picks me, I plan on putting a show on every Sunday.

 

Its been that kind of determination and confidence that has helped elevate Campbell from a player few teams showed interest in to a projected mid-round pick.

 

Whatever team drafts Lee, hell be ready to play in their system, said Derek Touchette, owner of Velocity Sports Performance.

 

Touchette has worked with numerous NFL players, such as Braylon Edwards of the New York Jets and wide receiver Hakeem Nicks, the New York Giants No. 1 draft pick last year.

 

Nearly every day since moving back to Naples in early January, Campbell has trained at Velocity Sports, often as long as six hours per day, getting ready to play on the professional level.

 

For prospective NFL players who have just left college, the big events where they can display their abilities before NFL coaches and scouts are senior all-star games and the NFL Combine, none of which initially invited Campbell to participate.

 

But two days before the East-West Shrine Game in Orlando, Campbells agent, J.R. Rickert, notified his client to pack his bags and get ready to play. Normally an inside linebacker, Campbell was thrust into outside position, one he had never played before.

 

Regardless, Campbell made a tackle on each of his first two plays, earning praise from former NFL head coach Mart Schottenheimer.

 

Its hard to come in late like he did, but he found a way to make a few plays out there, knocking people around, Schottenheimer said after the game. He stepped up and met the challenge.

 

An invitation to the NFL Combine soon followed, where Campbell ran a 4.88 in the 40-yard dash and impressed NFL teams with his football acumen.

 

Coaches said they loved how smart I was, said Campbell, who earned Academic All-Big Ten honors the past two years. They like how well I understood the game and my game film. They were real excited about my personality, about the way I approach every single day.

 

Already on the draft boards of the Miami Dolphins, Pittsburgh Steelers, Minnesota Vikings and Jacksonville Jaguars, Campbell expects to be hear from a team on the drafts second or third day.

 

When he gets drafted and where he goes is of no great concern. Let the cards fall where they may, Campbell said.

 

The one certainty of the draft is that Campbell will be spending it with family and friends, including parents Jack and Mary, and Campbells high school sweetheart, Desiree Hernandez, a former Dolphins cheerleader.

 

Theyve been with me through thick and thin, Campbell said. I want them to delight in that moment. Its important to be together and rejoice.

 

Since I was eight, its been my dream to play in the NFL. Im getting my opportunity and Im not letting it go to waste. Im going to do whatever it takes. People are going to see me playing in the NFL for the next 10 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"On his pro day at Minnesota, LB Lee Campbell ran the 40-yard dash in 4.79 seconds, the short shuttle in 4.20 seconds and the three-cone drill in 7.11 seconds. He measured a 34-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 1/2 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press. (from kffl)"

 

I'm confused, a 4.2 second short shuttle is very, very good...but a 7.11 three cone is more like a defensive linemen. Sounds like a good player though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"On his pro day at Minnesota, LB Lee Campbell ran the 40-yard dash in 4.79 seconds, the short shuttle in 4.20 seconds and the three-cone drill in 7.11 seconds. He measured a 34-inch vertical jump, a 9-foot-6 1/2 broad jump and completed 17 repetitions on the 225-pound bench press. (from kffl)"

 

I'm confused, a 4.2 second short shuttle is very, very good...but a 7.11 three cone is more like a defensive linemen. Sounds like a good player though...

Not very excited about his 4.79 yard either....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not very excited about his 4.79 yard either....

40 times are very decieving. It's pretty important in a Field and Track meet, but in football, it is not a sprint race.

A world class running back can run the 40 yard dash in 4.3 seconds. That means, that if every play was about a linebacker catching and running down a running back or wide reciever, the RB or WR would usually be 4 tenths of a second ahead of the linebacker after running nearly half the length of the football field.

 

What 40 times don't tell you...is the quickness in which a defender interprets the play and reacts. The fastest man in the world can lose a full second by being out of place because he misread the play. That's twice (or more) as long as the less than half second a linebacker would fail to catch a speedy wide reciever running half the length of the field.

 

Pierce wasn't particularly fast - but he could read a play and call it out and be where he needed to be (most the time).

 

Regardless....football isn't a track meet. There are footballers and there are track stars. Rarely do the two end up on the same field.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...