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Big Apple blows away Beantown — big time


jranieli
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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22792627/

 

 

Beantown? That’s it? Beantown?

 

There may be a city with a worse nickname somewhere, although I’m not sure what it could possibly be. Is there a Phlegmville out there?

 

On the one hand, you got Beantown. On the other, you got the Big Apple, Gotham, the City that Never Sleeps. Did Sinatra ever sing a song about Boston? Did anybody? Even the old rock group “Boston” never sang a song about Boston. No wonder Boston has such an inferiority complex. Compared to New York, it really is inferior.

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You want to put Boston in a good light, pick a comparable town. Like Cleveland. Or Sacramento. Maybe Minneapolis.

 

OK, Boston’s won two World Series in the past four seasons and the Foxborough Patriots have won three of the past six Super Bowls. Even a New Yorker will admit that’s a nice little run. But can we have a little perspective here?

 

The Yankees won the World Series five straight years from 1949-53 and went to the World Series in 10 of 11 seasons. More recently, they won three straight and four out of five. The Red Sox have, what, six titles? Call me when you get to 26, which is what the Yankees have, and then I’ll start adding in all the titles won by the Giants, Dodgers and Mets and you can slink back up I-95 and comfort yourselves with a nice, warm pot of beans.

 

I’ll grant you that nobody has ever dominated any sport the way the old Celtics did back when the NBA wasn’t important enough to get its playoff games broadcast nationally. And the Bruins were a pretty good hockey team back when the Knicks, which used to be a basketball team, were also pretty good.

 

But what have you guys really done? Three football titles, which matches the three that the Giants and Jets have won — not counting pre-Super Bowl championships, of which the Giants have four. A couple of World Series wins after 86 years of nothing, zip, nada. A basketball team that could win a title again — 22 years after its last one. In the immortal words of former Net Derrick Coleman, whoop-de-damn-do.

 

And when you get done feeling good about all of that, what’s left? New York has Broadway and Wall Street and Fashion Avenue and Harlem and Spanish Harlem and more museums than you can shake a palette knife at. Boston has, well, I’m not sure what it has. I was going to say Harvard and M.I.T., but those aren’t really in Boston; they’re across the river in Cambridge.

 

 

Anyway, even if we give Boston Harvard, when all of those movers and shakers take delivery of their sheepskins and go out into the great world, they don’t stay in Boston. They go to New York or Washington or somewhere else important.

 

Now, it may be that Boston has charms that I haven’t seen during my many visits to that town. And given the condition of the local streets, I never will see them.

 

Have you ever tried to get anywhere in Boston? There’s not a single 90-degree intersection in the entire city. And the next time someone stops for a red light will be the first.

 

OK, so there are subways, but they close down at night. What good is that?

 

Speaking of subways, have you ever wondered why in New York the subways are identified by letters and numbers, while in Boston they go by colors? Could it be that when they built their systems, people in New York could actually read and count? Just asking.

 

I’ll grant that Boston was a great city as recently as 220 years ago. And while New York was coddling Tories because that’s where the money was, Boston was off firing the shot heard round the world and starting the Revolution. (Of course, once Boston started it and fought a battle or two, it shipped the whole thing off to New York, New Jersey and Philly and finally to the Carolinas and Virginia and took the rest of the war off.) Back then, the only city with as much cachet as Boston was Philadelphia. But when it came time to choose a capital for the newly formed United States, George Washington rode up to New York City. And when the Founding Fathers were looking for a place to put the National Treasure, they put that in New York, too — or was that just a movie?

 

Anyway, it’s been a while since the days when if you said “Adams,” people didn’t automatically think of beer. Boston’s a fine little town, one that I have had many wonderful times in. But it ain’t New York, not in sports and not in anything else.

 

I admit it’s not perfect in New York. We do have to put up with Donald Trump, and Rudy Giuliani refuses to shut up and go talk family values with his third wife.

 

But on the whole, it’s a heck of a town.

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I'm not gonna email this writer. <_<

:LMAO: aw :unsure:

 

But in reality, the Patriots don't even belong to Boston. Yea, Gilette Stadium is in the city, but there's a reason their called the New England Patriots. If you look at it like this, 16.6 percent Boston's...lame

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But in reality, the Patriots don't even belong to Boston. Yea, Gilette Stadium is in the city, but there's a reason their called the New England Patriots.

 

Actually Gillette is not in Boston. It is 30 miles away in Foxboro, closer to Providence than Boston. Just like the NEW JERSEY Giants.

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Actually Gillette is not in Boston. It is 30 miles away in Foxboro, closer to Providence than Boston. Just like the NEW JERSEY Giants.

 

Oh no, Foxboro is CLOSE to Providence, The Meadowlands are actually IN Jersey............ <_<

 

 

Sorry, thats all I got.

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Actually Gillette is not in Boston. It is 30 miles away in Foxboro, closer to Providence than Boston. Just like the NEW JERSEY Giants.

 

No, not just like the New Jersey Giants because the Meadowlands is only 3-4 miles from New York.

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No, not just like the New Jersey Giants because the Meadowlands is only 3-4 miles from New York.

 

 

More like 7 or 8. But Giants Stadium is closer to Times Square

than Yankee and Shea Stadium. Yankee stadium is in a terrible

area and Shea is in east bumblefuck Queens.

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More like 7 or 8. But Giants Stadium is closer to Times Square

than Yankee and Shea Stadium. Yankee stadium is in a terrible

area and Shea is in east bumblefuck Queens.

 

If you want to consider driving it is about that but considering a straight shot.

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If you want to consider driving it is about that but considering a straight shot.

 

 

Oh yeah easily, Giants Stadium is alot closer to times square. Besides where

would you put the Giants or Jets now? Flushing Meadows? Not gonna happen,

people would be in an uproar. Alot of people, legal and illegal use that park

for recreational purposes.

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More like 7 or 8. But Giants Stadium is closer to Times Square

than Yankee and Shea Stadium. Yankee stadium is in a terrible

area and Shea is in east bumblefuck Queens.

 

Closer than Yankee stadium? I know Ive been gone awhile, but you sure about that? There on the same borough, Yankee stadium and Times Square.

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One thing for Boston, iits the home of stand up, when comedians in the 80's wanted to get noticed, they went to Boston.

Hmmmm....never heard that before. In fact, I've been to Boston no less than a hundred times and I have never heard of a natable comedy club.

 

In the 70's, 80's, and 90's....serious comics went to Chicago - usually to "Second City". A few notable comics started out there like the Joan Rivers, Belushi, Chris Farley, what the heck....I'll just cut and past from wiki.

 

Notable comics starting their careers at Second City

 

1970's

(1971) John Belushi (SNL, Animal House, The Blues Brothers, Neighbors)

(1973) Bill Murray (SNL, Groundhog Day, Lost in Translation, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Meatballs, Stripes)

(1973) Betty Thomas (Hill Street Blues)

(1975) George Wendt (Cheers)

(1973) Dan Aykroyd (SNL, Ghostbusters, Driving Miss Daisy, The Blues Brothers)

(1974) Michael Gellman

(1974) Eugene Levy (SCTV, A Mighty Wind, American Pie)

(1976) Shelley Long (Cheers)

(1978) James Belushi (SNL, According to Jim)

(1978) Tim Kazurinsky (SNL, Police Academy)

(1979) Mary Gross (SNL, Hot to Trot, Feds)

 

1980s

(1982) Meagen Fay (Kingdom Hospital, Six Feet Under, Desperate Housewives)

(1983) Richard Kind (Mad About You, Spin City)

(1985) Andy Dick (The Ben Stiller Show, NewsRadio, Less Than Perfect)

(1986) Dan Castellaneta (The Tracey Ullman Show, The Simpsons)

(1986) Bonnie Hunt (Life With Bonnie)

(1988) Mike Myers (SNL, Wayne's World, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, Shrek)

(1989) David Pasquesi (Strangers with Candy)(TJ & Dave)

(1989) Chris Farley (SNL, Tommy Boy, Black Sheep, Almost Heroes)

(1989) Tim Meadows (SNL, The Ladies Man, Mean Girls)

(1989) Tim O'Malley (Return to Me) (Godshow)

 

I won't list all the 90's stars to come out of Second City because the list is extensive, but I'll mention a couple of more notable ones:

 

(1991) Steve Carell (The Office,The 40-Year Old Virgin)

(1991) Jeff Garlin (Curb Your Enthusiasm,I Want Someone to Eat Cheese With)

(1993) Stephen Colbert (The Colbert Report, Strangers with Candy, Exit 57)

(1996) Tina Fey (SNL, Mean Girls, 30 Rock)

(1996) Horatio Sanz (SNL, Boat Trip)

 

 

Regardless....I think you probably get my point. The center of comedy and comic career kickoffs does NOT start in Boston.

 

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Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Bronx and Staten Island are the 5 Boroughs

 

Wow, how much I forget when Im gone. I coulda swore Manhattan and the Bronx were on the same borough. :rolleyes:

 

Thanks bud. But I still dont see how Giants Stadium is closer to Times Square than Yankee Stadium.

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More like 7 or 8. But Giants Stadium is closer to Times Square

than Yankee and Shea Stadium. Yankee stadium is in a terrible

area and Shea is in east bumblefuck Queens.

 

That area is undergoing major construction.. from a new stadium to some other huge project I don't recall what the hell... That area's real estate value will mor than double in the next few years.

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Oh yeah easily, Giants Stadium is alot closer to times square. Besides where

would you put the Giants or Jets now? Flushing Meadows? Not gonna happen,

people would be in an uproar. Alot of people, legal and illegal use that park

for recreational purposes.

 

If it's up to me, I'd put the Giants in Red Hook near down town brookly. Great location.. near the water probably a mile from the Statue of Liberty... people can get there by Train, Bus, or Ferry... It's mostly commercial there but there lots of low income housing... welfare... fuck that.. move them to Alaska... There shouldn't be any "housing" in prime areas like the Lower East Side for example....

 

I know it's a moot point now since the new Stadium is being built.

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Wow, how much I forget when Im gone. I coulda swore Manhattan and the Bronx were on the same borough. :rolleyes:

 

Thanks bud. But I still dont see how Giants Stadium is closer to Times Square than Yankee Stadium.

 

They just shared the same area code "212" back then :rolleyes:

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