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:rock: Your doing an awesome job bro!! :rock:

 

 

:cheers: Cheers to another Subway Series!!! :cheers:

 

 

p.s. I just read an article about how everyone hates the Mets/Yanks because we both tied for best record in baseball, and they think it's not fair...hahahah

 

 

:cwy: "Cry me a fricken river." -Dr. Evil

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:rock: Your doing an awesome job bro!! :rock:

:cheers: Cheers to another Subway Series!!! :cheers:

p.s. I just read an article about how everyone hates the Mets/Yanks because we both tied for best record in baseball, and they think it's not fair...hahahah

:cwy: "Cry me a fricken river." -Dr. Evil

I'd like to see that article. Link?

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I'll do my best to run this section as well as Plax 4 Prez. :TU:

 

Bow Down. :P

 

I shall defy you :furious: .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I retract my statement :mellow: .

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I'd like to see that article. Link?

yeah... here ya go linky (I don't know if the link takes you in the story so I'll post it too)

 

For Some, Subway Series Is Off The Rails

 

CHICAGO(AP) Hold on there a minute, New York. Not everyone is on board with your plans for another Subway Series. For most fans around the country, the idea of a Yankees-Mets World Series holds about as much appeal as a five-hour rain delay. Oakland vs. San Diego, Minnesota vs. St. Louis, Detroit vs. the Mets _ any matchup will do as long as it isn't all New York, all the time.

 

"I hate New York," groaned Andre McDearmon, a Chicago White Sox fan. "They've always been in it, and it's getting kind of tired."

 

Try telling that to New Yorkers.

 

Everyone in the five boroughs, it seems, is giddily anticipating a Mets-Yankees World Series. "Full Steam Ahead," blared the cover headline of the New York Post's playoff section. "Ready to Roll," trumpeted the Daily News, with cartoons of Yankees manager Joe Torre and Mets counterpart Willie Randolph in front of a subway train.

 

When Jason Giambi homered in the Yankees' 8-4 victory over Detroit on Tuesday night, a fan held up a sign reading, "SUBWAY POWER."

 

Never mind there are two rounds of playoffs to get through first, and there are some formidable teams standing in the way of a Subway Series. Oh, and don't forget the bum leg that knocked El Duque out of the playoffs.

 

"There's a local arrogance associated with that," said Mark Offenbacher, a Detroit Tigers fan from Chicago. "They think it's their right."

 

No one is saying a Mets-Yankees World Series wouldn't be good baseball. The teams finished the regular season with identical 97-65 records, the best in baseball. It's the first time since 1956 that New York teams had the best record in each league. Their six interleague meetings were an even split, with the first four games decided by two runs or less.

 

You can't beat the nostalgia factor, either. New York was once home to four teams, and they were World Series regulars in the old days. There were seven Subway Series from 1947 to 1956 alone.

 

"If you're any nostalgic baseball fan, just based on the history of the game, you would appreciate the Subway Series," said San Diego's Mike Piazza, a Met when the last all-New York series was played in 2000.

 

"We, obviously, and other teams, hope that that's not the trend this year."

 

They're not the only ones. When the Mets and Yankees met in the 2000 World Series, it produced what were then the worst ratings for the Fall Classic. In 30 of the 40 largest TV markets after New York, there was a double-digit drop in percentage of viewers from 1999.

 

Those low ratings have since been "topped," first by the all-California series in 2002 and then by the White Sox's sweep of Houston last year. But another Subway Series isn't likely to be any bigger of a draw than it was six years ago.

 

"If you put the Yankees in, you'd probably get a lot of people in to watch the games to root against the Yankees. But the Mets? I think that'll turn a lot of people off," said David Gronauer, the manager of Game Day Sports Cafe in Cincinnati. "The New York cachet thing just doesn't fly here."

 

Why, though? If the Cubs and White Sox were on course for a Crosstown Series, the entire country would be rooting for it. Preparing for the end of the world, perhaps, but rooting nonetheless. Fans from all over tuned in when San Franisco and Oakland played in 1989, though an earthquake did add to the intrigue.

 

But New York is, well, New York. There's a reason Frank Sinatra sang, "If I can make it there, I'll make it anywhere," about New York and not Los Angeles, Dallas or Miami. It's the country's biggest city in both population and influence. The epicenter of everything that's anything, from culture to commerce to cool, with the attitude to match.

 

There's a whole other country outside New York, though, and it tends to resent being dragged along in the big city's wake.

 

"Let New York do their own thing, I could care less," Chicagoan Richard Williams said. "They're self-centered."

 

Then there's the money factor.

 

With a seemingly limitless payroll and roster filled with All-Stars, the Yankees are the team everybody loves _ or loves to hate. Their $200 million payroll is more than that of the five poorest teams combined, and is about $80 million more than the second-place Boston Red Sox.

 

The Mets aren't exactly slouches, either, spending more than $100 million this season.

 

"(A Subway Series) becomes the kind of thing that raises temperatures in New York City, but becomes an annoyance to everyone else," said Marc Ganis, president of Sportscorp Ltd., a Chicago-based sports consulting firm.

 

"The annoyance factor actually comes in from the perceived arrogance factor of the two teams. And the perception that the rich get richer," Ganis added. "They have the biggest market in country. They get the most money from local television. They can charge the most for their tickets. Because of that, they have all the resources. Why should we baseball fans in Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Kansas City, Minnesota care very much about them?"

 

Not everyone outside New York is turned off by the prospect of a Subway Series, though. There are some who'd actually like to see it, even if they're not Yankees or Mets fans.

 

"Obviously, I only care about the Sox," said Richard Fournier, a Red Sox fan from Medford, Mass. "But if the Yankees are in the Series, I have a vested interest in watching them lose."

 

___

 

AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum and AP Sports Writers Bernie Wilson and Jimmy Golen contributed to this report.

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