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Giants and Jets among 9 teams blocking new CBA


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from PFT:

 

GANG OF NINE REVEALED

 

NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw recently said that nine NFL franchises are resisting the expansion of revenue sharing by the league's 32 teams. Upshaw also told Mark Maske of The Washington Post that the nine teams are planning to file suit if they are forced to share revenues that currently are not distributed evenly among all teams.

 

A league source has identified for us the members of this modern-day Mudville nine: the Redskins, Eagles, Cowboys, Giants, Jets, Panthers, Broncos, Patriots, and Texans.

 

We'd previously heard that the NFL and the union tentatively have agreed to expand the components of so-called "Defined Gross Revenue" (which is the basis for the team-by-team salary cap) to include money not currently shared by the various franchises. The proponents of enhanced revenue argue that, if any currently unshared revenue streams are to be included in the determination of DGR, the corresponding revenue should be shared equally -- and that, if the revenue is not to be shared, it should be excluded from the DGR calculation.

 

The source also confirmed that the Mudville nine plan to sue if they are forced to accept expanded revenue sharing by the other 23 organizations. Frankly, we still don't understand how it would ever come to that, since nine votes are sufficient to block any changes to the way the NFL does business, given that 24 "yes" votes would be required to, for example, impose expanded revenue sharing.

 

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello tells us that, under the current system, teams share all national broadcast revenues, all sponsorship revenues, all licensing revenues, and the visiting team's share of ticket revenues. The following revenues aren't shared: the home team's share of the box-office revenue, local radio revenue, local TV revenue, local sponsorship revenue, and stadium-generated revenues from signage, concessions, parking, luxury suites, etc.

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the nfl is turning into communism......taking from the rich and spreading it around.....

 

Revenue sharing has been a staple of the league for several years and is a primary reason why the NFL is the most prominent pro sport in America.

 

Revenue sharing allows teams like the Lions and Cards, for example, to operate inefficiently yet still turn profits. It is one of the features of the NFL that effectively gives it monopoly power. If anything, revenue sharing has capitalistic effects on NFL franchises and potential competitors (AFL, USFL, XFL). Far from communistic.

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Revenue sharing has been a staple of the league for several years and is a primary reason why the NFL is the most prominent pro sport in America.

 

Revenue sharing allows teams like the Lions and Cards, for example, to operate inefficiently yet still turn profits. It is one of the features of the NFL that effectively gives it monopoly power. If anything, revenue sharing has capitalistic effects on NFL franchises and potential competitors (AFL, USFL, XFL). Far from communisti

 

I agree totally. It's only unfair if you think of the implications of national TV coverage that generates interests in some teams, like the Boys. Of course, the Lions are also televised every T-day and since they stink, they're still not one of the most profitbale teams.

 

It's good for all of us, otherwise there wouldn't be any Cardinals to beat up on or the aformentioned Lions.

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