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Henry Hynoski - What can we expect?


BleedinBlue
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Read a great article on Hynoski and it'll be interesting to see if he becomes a bigger part of the offense.....even though we've loaded Eli with a lot of new offensive weapons to choose from, we might be surprised at what this guy can do.

 

Anyway....check it out:

 

Henry Hynoski
is Ready For a Bigger Role in the Giants' Offense

 

 

By many accounts, Giants fullback Henry Hynoski had an impressive NFL debut which included becoming the only rookie on offense last season to win and hold a starting job throughout the season, a job in which he laid several key blocks in the running game and in which he caught 12 passes for 83 yards (6.9 average) in the regular season to boot.

 

But for as good as he was last year, Hynoski, now entering his sophomore year as a Giant, knows he can get better, and that’s exactly what he’s been focusing on this off-season as he prepares for what will hopefully be a larger role in the offense.

 

“This off-season I really put an emphasis on building up my upper body,” he said, adding that he also managed to reduce his overall body fat while maintaining his weight of 266. “You can always work on speed, but the big thing with me especially with my mid-season injury last year was developing my upper body, and that’s what I did.”

 

Indeed, without any sort of pads on during the Giants’ first OTA practice this spring, Hynoski was among the Giants who clearly looked as though he had reaped the benefits of his off-season training. The change in his body and strength, combined with the confidence he has following his successful rookie season had him turning in a solid showing in the opening practice.

 

“I feel fast. I feel quick, I feel athletic, I feel like I have a good change of direction just today running through the hole, making quick cuts on my read, turning back in and ‘hitting’ linebackers,” he said. “I feel very quick and athletic also, so I feel that my off-season program, since I got back here really took off.”

 

He’s also wiser when it comes to the playbook. Not one to make many mistakes in executing his assignments, Hynoski was flying around the field looking as though he drew up the plays himself. He correctly identified a linebacker trying to fill a hole on a David Wilson run; he blocked a “blitzing” linebacker” on a pass in 7-on-7 drills, and he managed to get out into the flat with little to no effort, catching everything thrown his way.

 

“I felt so confident,” he said about his knowledge of the Giants’ playbook. “I was reviewing the script before practice, and everything just came like second nature, and it’s so ingrained in my system now.

“When I first went out there, I thought I would struggle a bit, just getting back into the swing. But I feel like I picked up where I left off – maybe even a bit ahead of things.”

 

In addition to improving himself physically, Hynoski, an avid student of the game, spent a lot of time this off-season studying film.

 

“I was watching film (of myself) closely, and I noticed that a some of the time, I would false-step out of my stance, which would cause me a delay of just a split second,” he said. “That’s something I’m really emphasizing working on. I’m in the two-point stance, so a lot of times, I would take a false step if I need to go forward real quick.”

 

Once he gets that corrected, he said, he’ll get to where he needs to be a lot quicker.

 

By the end of summer camp, Hynoski is hoping that his hard work leads to an increased role in the Giants offense. While he will still be called upon to be the battering ran in the running game, Hynoski, who was a prolific running back at Southern Columbia High School, is hoping to get his hands on the ball a little more this season.

 

“I kind of see how things are developing (and) I think I’m going to touch the ball a little more this year,” he said. “Obviously, I’ll have to be the hammer like I was last year, and lead block.

“I think eventually (the coaches) are going to look to expand my personnel packages and use me in different ways, especially in the passing game.”

 

If he can excel in an expanded role, the Giants will have something they haven’t had in quite some time – a versatile fullback who, when he steps onto the field, will have to be accounted for by opposing defenses in both the run and pass games.

 

“I just want to go in and be in the best possible shape I can be in,” he said about his plan for the rest of the off-season. “I don’t want to have to take a second wind and I don’t want to be tired. I want to go out there every play and feel 100 percent.”

 

If he can accomplish that, he could be pretty hard to stop this season .
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For a team that doesn't feature the FB much it's good to have a promising player to keep defenses off guard. I'm more interested in his contribution to the running game. I just can't wait to see what David Wilson can do... in the words of Osi4, I'm gonna cream my pants lol

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a fullback that is not a very good lead blocker?

 

I'd love to see some different running formation other than singleback and shotgun draws...but we can't do that because Hynoski is garbage.

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a fullback that is not a very good lead blocker?

 

I'd love to see some different running formation other than singleback and shotgun draws...but we can't do that because Hynoski is garbage.

 

I hate hate hate shotgun draws but they're a necessary evil. You have to be willing and able to run out of the shotgun to keep the defense honest, though I wouldn't mind seeing a few good ol' fashioned pitches.

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I hate hate hate shotgun draws but they're a necessary evil. You have to be willing and able to run out of the shotgun to keep the defense honest, though I wouldn't mind seeing a few good ol' fashioned pitches.

 

true. The shotgun draws inside the 20 grate on me, though (with the exception of the Danny Ware 2 point conversions that somehow worked---probably because no team believed the Giants could run such a terrible play at the 1 yard line)

 

I just thought last year (and this isn't the first time I've mentioned this, I'm sticking to my guns) the run game suffered just as much because we had no lead blocker (if you go back and look at seasons that team ran well as a whole, Hedgecock was leading the way and involved in tons of running plays), it just seemed to me that the offense strayed from that formula and let Bradshaw and Jacobs try to get more on their own.

 

there were multiple factors, and I think one of those was Hynoski's inability to be an effective lead blocker.

 

I'd rather my fullback be making blocks than catching one pass a game.

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I also like Hynoski.

 

He will be a great FB if he stays healthy, he's tough as nails and really strong.

 

He's got good hands as well.

 

He just needs to be more consistent as a blocker, and I think he will. He's a traditional FB.

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I thought he was far and away the worst fullback we've seen on this team since Charles Stackhouse.

 

Maybe not that bad but he was bad. Maybe he'll get his shit together but being a FB isn't rocket surgery. He was constantly whiffing on blocks.

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Maybe not that bad but he was bad. Maybe he'll get his shit together but being a FB isn't rocket surgery. He was constantly whiffing on blocks.

 

I'm glad someone else saw it

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true. The shotgun draws inside the 20 grate on me, though (with the exception of the Danny Ware 2 point conversions that somehow worked---probably because no team believed the Giants could run such a terrible play at the 1 yard line)

 

I just thought last year (and this isn't the first time I've mentioned this, I'm sticking to my guns) the run game suffered just as much because we had no lead blocker (if you go back and look at seasons that team ran well as a whole, Hedgecock was leading the way and involved in tons of running plays), it just seemed to me that the offense strayed from that formula and let Bradshaw and Jacobs try to get more on their own.

 

there were multiple factors, and I think one of those was Hynoski's inability to be an effective lead blocker.

 

I'd rather my fullback be making blocks than catching one pass a game.

 

He made his share of mistakes but he was a rookie.

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I saw it early on, I also saw steady improvement and good blocking towards the end of the year.

 

This is what I thought too. Halfway through the season I could have sworn he was deactivated for some games because he was whiffing so bad, but towards the end of the season he seemed to improve.

 

Of course, he'll never amount to anything in the NFL unless he masters the devastating 'Cock swing pass... the most lethal play in football.

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I saw it early on, I also saw steady improvement and good blocking towards the end of the year.

 

I agree.

 

This is what I thought too. Halfway through the season I could have sworn he was deactivated for some games because he was whiffing so bad, but towards the end of the season he seemed to improve.

 

Exactly how I remember it going down. I remember being relived when they sat him down, and surprised when he came back and didn't completely suck.

 

Of course, he'll never amount to anything in the NFL unless he masters the devastating 'Cock swing pass... the most lethal play in football.

 

LOL.... Hynocerous looks pretty good with the ball in his hands, I'll give him that.

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Yes, he struggled, and by the end of the year he was really rounding into form as a lead blocker. He has a ton of promise and by no means should he be defined right now as if that's all he's going to be in the NFL. And he did make a few plays on a swing pass here and there. He's has pretty good feet for a big man, got a little quick to him.

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After reading the article, I think he has the right mindset to become a solid player for us. I like playerswho work extra hard on their off time - both physically and mentally - to make themselves better and to improve their bodies for the game. A lot of players were simply born with a gift of extraordinary ahtletic talent and won't work really hard to improve. Hynoski is your lunch pail guy who wants to do whatever it takes to be better. I love those kind of guys.

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What's the quote Bleedin'? Hard work with mediocre talent beats mediocre work with great talent. A few years ago I talked about a key ingredient with championship teams is having a lot of character guys. I think we have that. Even looking at the most recent first round picks... David Wilson, Prince Amukamara, Nicks, and JPP, all guys with tremendous character... guys you know are effort guys. That's the real secret to success, and Reese knows this. Moreover, it seems some teams don't... You look at the Eagles, building their team around Vick. And the Bengals, although I like Dalton and AJ Green, they seem to constantly be accumulating players with character issues. Our team is built around character players. You look at all 22 starters, and at every position, they are effort, high character guys. That's what I love about our team, and that's another reason, with good health, we'll be back in the playoffs this year.

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I agree Jim, but we bring in plenty of players with "yellow" flag character issues.

 

Michael Boley (wife beater)

Rocky Bernard (wife beater)

McKenzie (DWI, not that bad)

Gave those guys big money.

 

Marvin Austin (college knucklehead)

Hakeem Nicks (labeled lazy) (lol obviously false)

Hosely (smokes mad weed)

Bradshaw (smoke and robs Ps2s) (in college)

Bennet (knucklehead!)

Jansen Jackson (Arned robbery and smokes mad weed)

Will Hill (pro idiot)

 

I'm forgetting a bunch, but let's not make our team out to be a bunch of saints.

 

One thing that we have that other teams don't, TOM COUGHLIN!

 

He fixes mildly questionable minds into good soldiers. Minus Plax.

 

 

 

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I agree Jim, but we bring in plenty of players with "yellow" flag character issues.

 

Michael Boley (wife beater)

Rocky Bernard (wife beater)

McKenzie (DWI, not that bad)

Gave those guys big money.

 

Marvin Austin (college knucklehead)

Hakeem Nicks (labeled lazy) (lol obviously false)

Hosely (smokes mad weed)

Bradshaw (smoke and robs Ps2s) (in college)

Bennet (knucklehead!)

Jansen Jackson (Arned robbery and smokes mad weed)

Will Hill (pro idiot)

 

I'm forgetting a bunch, but let's not make our team out to be a bunch of saints.

 

One thing that we have that other teams don't, TOM COUGHLIN!

 

He fixes mildly questionable minds into good soldiers. Minus Plax.

 

A lot of those guys were low round picks and undrafted guys. And Ahmad has worked hard to get better in the NFL. And I'm talking about the core of our team. Now there are two different things, which I think are both important, when I'm talking about character... one being a hard worker, not settling for anything but the best you can be, and secondly, is the good off the field stuff like you are mainly talking about. Plax, yes, was low character. And I think we had guys come in that we did give a lot of money to that had big time questions with character. Some was foreseeable (Plax), others not so much (Shockey).

 

Boley I think is a high character guy. He's a leader on the team, a pro's pro. And remember, that is alleged domestic violence... key word is ALLEGED. One thing I've learned is bitches will lie. The core of our team are all high character players.

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No arguements from me. I like Boley also.

 

Just wanted to clarify that we do have a few thugs on the team lol.

 

I think it's more credit to Couglhlin and team leaders Eli & Tuck then anyone else. They keep this team in check.

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Yes, he struggled, and by the end of the year he was really rounding into form as a lead blocker. He has a ton of promise and by no means should he be defined right now as if that's all he's going to be in the NFL. And he did make a few plays on a swing pass here and there. He's has pretty good feet for a big man, got a little quick to him.

 

Yeah, I remember him getting a pretty key first down in the playoffs, if I recall correctly....I could be wrong.

 

Our run game did start to improve towards the end there....I didn't particularly notice improved blocking from Hynoski but it seems most of you guys did

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