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Football is a game won and lost in the trenches


JackStroud
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if you weigh our 60% of the game is in the trenches the Giants start every game with a huge advantage over most teams

 

1- their DLine is going to be better than any opponent

2- their O-line is good and getting better so your DLine will not stop the Giants

3- with the possibility exception of the Packers no other O-line can withstand the Giants Siege (Krakken)

4- your Dline will not likely get to Eli very much

 

So before the 1st kick off most every team is behind the 8 ball

 

To beat the Giants your Passing and Running games will have to be better than the Giants by a big margin......tough to do

 

So other teams are left with two options- have much better Special Teams and/or play with far more enthusiasim and coaching and catch the Giants napping (see Giants 1st game of the year)- again not likely

 

in the past you could out QB or WR the Giants.....Not Anymore

 

There are lots of other variables- kicking, fumbles, tipped balls that could go in your favor against the Giants but again not likely

 

Ergo there is an 80% probability the Giants will win the Lombardi this year

 

Teams like the Eagles and Cowboys with weaker Olines and Dlines - the dream teams will just have to keep on dreaming until they strengthen their trenches

 

this is the secret to why I thought the Giants would blow out the Patriots.........I was wrong, the Patriots Dline and OLine were much better than I had anticipated......The Patriots are not finished.....we may see them again in the Super Bowl

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Guest StrahansGap

Horseshoes is a game where whoever's horseshoe lands closest to the pin, wins. It is very similar to Bocci ball and curling because you have the opportunity to knock an opponents horseshoe, stone or bocci ball far from their respective pin, bullseye or mini ball.

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Horseshoes is a game where whoever's horseshoe lands closest to the pin, wins. It is very similar to Bocci ball and curling because you have the opportunity to knock an opponents horseshoe, stone or bocci ball far from their respective pin, bullseye or mini ball.

 

Comedy is not your strong suit my friend.........stick to cursing out dead people :rolleyes:

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There are no real trenches on a football field. The fields are actually curved slightly to allow for drainage.

 

The trenches referred to here are actually more of a metaphorical construct. It's an allusion to "trench warfare" as practiced in the Great War of 1914-1918. In that conflict, a series of inter-connected slit-redoubts, called trenches, were both home and battlefield for millions of troops from many nations. Between the opposing trenches was an area of devastation called "no man's land."

 

In a football context, this corresponds to the line of scrimmage, just before the beginning of a play. Just as the redoubts faced each other across a field where no one was able to cross safely, offensive and defensive linemen face each other over the "neutral zone"--an equivalent to "no man's land" in World War I.

 

Both the structure of the line of scrimmage and the violence that commences there makes this metaphor appropriate, albeit hyperbole.

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There are no real trenches on a football field. The fields are actually curved slightly to allow for drainage.

 

The trenches referred to here are actually more of a metaphorical construct. It's an allusion to "trench warfare" as practiced in the Great War of 1914-1918. In that conflict, a series of inter-connected slit-redoubts, called trenches, were both home and battlefield for millions of troops from many nations. Between the opposing trenches was an area of devastation called "no man's land."

 

In a football context, this corresponds to the line of scrimmage, just before the beginning of a play. Just as the redoubts faced each other across a field where no one was able to cross safely, offensive and defensive linemen face each other over the "neutral zone"--an equivalent to "no man's land" in World War I.

 

Both the structure of the line of scrimmage and the violence that commences there makes this metaphor appropriate, albeit hyperbole.

 

Excellent point, Fish.

 

I think it's important to point out that while a football is sometimes referred to as "pigskin", modern balls are in fact constructed of rubber and plastic.

 

However, the first balls were made of natural materials, such as an inflated pig bladder, sometimes inside a leather cover. It was this early manufacture from which the slang term "pigskin" owes it's genesis.

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There are no real trenches on a football field. The fields are actually curved slightly to allow for drainage.

 

The trenches referred to here are actually more of a metaphorical construct. It's an allusion to "trench warfare" as practiced in the Great War of 1914-1918. In that conflict, a series of inter-connected slit-redoubts, called trenches, were both home and battlefield for millions of troops from many nations. Between the opposing trenches was an area of devastation called "no man's land."

 

In a football context, this corresponds to the line of scrimmage, just before the beginning of a play. Just as the redoubts faced each other across a field where no one was able to cross safely, offensive and defensive linemen face each other over the "neutral zone"--an equivalent to "no man's land" in World War I.

 

Both the structure of the line of scrimmage and the violence that commences there makes this metaphor appropriate, albeit hyperbole.

 

You complete me :wub:

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There are no real trenches on a football field. The fields are actually curved slightly to allow for drainage.

 

The trenches referred to here are actually more of a metaphorical construct. It's an allusion to "trench warfare" as practiced in the Great War of 1914-1918. In that conflict, a series of inter-connected slit-redoubts, called trenches, were both home and battlefield for millions of troops from many nations. Between the opposing trenches was an area of devastation called "no man's land."

 

In a football context, this corresponds to the line of scrimmage, just before the beginning of a play. Just as the redoubts faced each other across a field where no one was able to cross safely, offensive and defensive linemen face each other over the "neutral zone"--an equivalent to "no man's land" in World War I.

 

Both the structure of the line of scrimmage and the violence that commences there makes this metaphor appropriate, albeit hyperbole.

'The whole 9 yards' is also a military term.

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Yeah you basically crack a camel across its skull to get moving all while avoiding the bites, kicks and spitting.... :05-mafia:

 

No you infidel that's not how it's done... we slap them in the ass and they like it :sheeplover:

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