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Should the Giants Avoid Drafting Players Who Aren't Smart?


BleedinBlue
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I think part of Joseph's problem was that he was a native Haitian/Creole speaker up until his teenage years when he came to the States. So he is probably mentally translating everything he hears or reads in English back into Creole. Not unusual for someone who learns another language beyond the age of 10.

 

then that doesn't exactly say too much for the U of Miami where he attended college...

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in the dog's opinion, these tests have little value in predicting success in the NFL. The fact is, individuals with cognitive delays will still be highly successful when receiving on-going specialized training in a specific trade over extended years. It is why students with significant cognitive impairments start receiving pre-vocational training in school. It is of little value for these students to learn about the middle colonies, as they will not have the cognitive potential to retain the information pertinent to their lives. So you provide them with specific training to be successful in a trade after schooling is completed. Anyone that is drafted in the NFL has most likely been playing organized football from an extremely young age, and has been gaining specific training pertinent to their position for many years. Whether or not they can answer general knowledge questions quickly is less relevant...

 

Marino is less an anomoly then he is a product of understanding a specific trade.

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in the dog's opinion, these tests have little value in predicting success in the NFL. The fact is, individuals with cognitive delays will still be highly successful when receiving on-going specialized training in a specific trade over extended years. It is why students with significant cognitive impairments start receiving pre-vocational training in school. It is of little value for these students to learn about the middle colonies, as they will not have the cognitive potential to retain the information pertinent to their lives. So you provide them with specific training to be successful in a trade after schooling is completed. Anyone that is drafted in the NFL has most likely been playing organized football from an extremely young age, and has been gaining specific training pertinent to their position for many years. Whether or not they can answer general knowledge questions quickly is less relevant...

Marino is less an anomoly then he is a product of understanding a specific trade.

 

I dont know about that. I mean, I for one would rather have my QB answer a Trivial Pursuit question than throw a TD.

 

Teach them football skills......GIMME A BREAK! Eli better know how many apples he would have if he started with 5 and Lucy took 2!

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I dont know about that. I mean, I for one would rather have my QB answer a Trivial Pursuit question than throw a TD.

Teach them football skills......GIMME A BREAK! Eli better know how many apples he would have if he started with 5 and Lucy took 2!

 

dog's not sure where you are going here...the fact is, there are many people with high IQ's that can't comprehend how to fix a car engine because they lack the specific training, while you could have a mechanic with a low IQ that can do effectively in no time flat, because he has specialized training in a specific field...

 

The fact is, general knowledge is less relevant then football knowledge when it comes to on the field performance...the dog doesn't really care if Eli Manning can do basic addition or subtraction - effectively read a defense, deliver the ball accurately and on time, and you can have an IQ of 3 for all the dog cares...

 

now to use your example, if the dog was drafting a team to compete in a Trivial Pursuit Challenge, well then yes, IQ may matter more...

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dog's not sure where you are going here...the fact is, there are many people with high IQ's that can't comprehend how to fix a car engine because they lack the specific training, while you could have a mechanic with a low IQ that can do effectively in no time flat, because he has specialized training in a specific field...

 

The fact is, general knowledge is less relevant then football knowledge when it comes to on the field performance...the dog doesn't really care if Eli Manning can do basic addition or subtraction - effectively read a defense, deliver the ball accurately and on time, and you can have an IQ of 3 for all the dog cares...

 

now to use your example, if the dog was drafting a team to compete in a Trivial Pursuit Challenge, well then yes, IQ may matter more...

 

You really need a vacation. <_<

 

 

 

I was joking.

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You really need a vacation. <_<

I was joking.

 

that is why the dog said he wasn't sure where you were going with that...it appeared that many were siding on the importance of this test as a measuring stick for success, and IQ tests are what they are...

 

 

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that is why the dog said he wasn't sure where you were going with that...it appeared that many were siding on the importance of this test as a measuring stick for success, and IQ tests are what they are...

 

Oh, I agree. Doesn't mean it guarantees a H.O.F. spot with a high score. Kinda why I was clownin around about it. That, and the fact that scoring high isnt a must, but DAMN, how dumb do you have to be get like a 3?? :huh:

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I could care less what their test score was, just be physically capable and stay out of legal trouble. Any player who manages to stay out of legal trouble and play a good game is already smarter than Pacman Jones, Michael Vick, Chris Henry & half the Bengals roster, etc.

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dog's not sure where you are going here...the fact is, there are many people with high IQ's that can't comprehend how to fix a car engine because they lack the specific training, while you could have a mechanic with a low IQ that can do effectively in no time flat, because he has specialized training in a specific field...

 

The fact is, general knowledge is less relevant then football knowledge when it comes to on the field performance...the dog doesn't really care if Eli Manning can do basic addition or subtraction - effectively read a defense, deliver the ball accurately and on time, and you can have an IQ of 3 for all the dog cares...

 

now to use your example, if the dog was drafting a team to compete in a Trivial Pursuit Challenge, well then yes, IQ may matter more...

 

IQ is more important than that. It determines your learning capacity, not your present intelligence.

It has nothing to do with specialized intelligence like mechanics, but how well you can "learn".

 

Big difference little doggy.

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The wonderlic is not a conclusive indication of intelligence, let alone football intelligence. Just like any standardized test, it has its limitations and its biases. If someone scores highly, it tells you they have good general intelligence and test-taking skills. But it's not by any means a predictor of smart players. Being able to hit a receiver in stride, track the ball in the air, take the proper angle to a ballcarrier, etc. ... all of those skills require cognitive functioning and unique mental processes, and none of that can be calculated with a written test.

 

Additionally, a player's ability to understand his responsibilities within a scheme isn't reflected in his wonderlic score. Learning from a coach with visual aid and repititions is a completely different intellectual task than answering a multiple choice correctly or retaining worldly knowledge. In other words, the wonderlic is not a valid test for projecting the intelligence of football players ... it might be valid for assessing doctors or lawyers, but not NFL prospects.

 

When evaluating prospects, NFL teams rely on their own internal methods for testing players' intelligence. This involves having the prospect meet with the coaching staff to discuss the basic principles of the offense/defense, extensive interviews, and psychological testing. The wonderlic is a very small piece of the puzzle, and often a misleading piece at that. Smart football players -- or at least adequately intelligent players -- will distinguish themselves through personal interactions with coaches and onfield performance. High wonderlic scorers probably did well on their SATs. There's an enormous difference.

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I've been great. Busy, but still having fun. How about you?

 

Sorry so late on the response.

 

Ive been good. REAL busy, but I always find time to get on here. Its mainly because I work from home alot. Whats been keeping you so busy?

 

Good to see you again bud, hope to see you more.

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