Jump to content
SportsWrath

Why aren't pre 1967 NFL Championships considered in the same boat as Super Bowls?


jranieli
 Share

Recommended Posts

I just don't understand why they don't seem to be a big deal. You never hear the media talking about the Giants NFL championships but just only hear about 2 Super Bowls. We always bust on Eagles fans for no trophies but they do have trophies, 3 NFL Championships. I think it is stupid not to consider these. Why is it when the NBA took the ABA franchises, pre 1976 championships are still recognized. I just have a hard time understanding this. I know NFL championships are still recognized but aren't even in the same boat as Super Bowls.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just don't understand why they don't seem to be a big deal. You never hear the media talking about the Giants NFL championships but just only hear about 2 Super Bowls. We always bust on Eagles fans for no trophies but they do have trophies, 3 NFL Championships. I think it is stupid not to consider these. Why is it when the NBA took the ABA franchises, pre 1976 championships are still recognized. I just have a hard time understanding this. I know NFL championships are still recognized but aren't even in the same boat as Super Bowls.

 

Here is the short answer: No one cares that the Giants finished ahead of the Pottsville Maroons, Dayton Triangles, or Duluth Eskimos in 1927.

 

Do you know any Dayton Triangle fans?

 

Moreover, the teams that have been consistently spanking the Giants since their existence, the Dallas Cowboys come to mind, did not exist back then.

 

Too bad for you people the Dayton Triangles aren't still around. They may have been Eli's first playoff victory. :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just don't understand why they don't seem to be a big deal. You never hear the media talking about the Giants NFL championships but just only hear about 2 Super Bowls. We always bust on Eagles fans for no trophies but they do have trophies, 3 NFL Championships. I think it is stupid not to consider these. Why is it when the NBA took the ABA franchises, pre 1976 championships are still recognized. I just have a hard time understanding this. I know NFL championships are still recognized but aren't even in the same boat as Super Bowls.

Because of the merger...That's really why. If it wasn't for the merger and share revenuel agreement, historic teams like the Steelers, Green Bay, Dallas (Who were on the verge of losing their second team to finantual problems) wouldn't be here today. They would suffer the same fate as the Dayton Triangles. Its one of the reason why Willington Mara is a HOF owner. He pretty much created the SB and saved the NFL from desolving.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the short answer: No one cares that the Giants finished ahead of the Pottsville Maroons, Dayton Triangles, or Duluth Eskimos in 1927.

 

Do you know any Dayton Triangle fans?

 

Moreover, the teams that have been consistently spanking the Giants since their existence, the Dallas Cowboys come to mind, did not exist back then.

 

Too bad for you people the Dayton Triangles aren't still around. They may have been Eli's first playoff victory. :o

 

Yeah... who's ever heard of the Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers anyway. :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think if any team should be bothered by this, it's Green Bay. You really don't get the idea of just how dominant that team was in the sixties if you only consider the two Superbowl wins. They also won championships in 1961, 1962 (sadly, both times against the Giants), and 1965--which causes the praise for Lombardi to make much more sense. Oh, they lost the championship in 1960 against Philly--another team that should be annoyed, for obvious reasons. 6 times to the big dance in 8 years--and only 2 remembered: that would piss me off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think if any team should be bothered by this, it's Green Bay. You really don't get the idea of just how dominant that team was in the sixties if you only consider the two Superbowl wins. They also won championships in 1961, 1962 (sadly, both times against the Giants), and 1965--which causes the praise for Lombardi to make much more sense. Oh, they lost the championship in 1960 against Philly--another team that should be annoyed, for obvious reasons. 6 times to the big dance in 8 years--and only 2 remembered: that would piss me off.

 

It does not matter though. They were playing teams like the Pottsville Maroons and Dayton Triangles so their championships should not even be compared to those of today. Lets face it, they didn't even wear as much padding so they don't deserve to be included. :rolleyes:

 

Thanks for a logical reply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does not matter though. They were playing teams like the Pottsville Maroons and Dayton Triangles so their championships should not even be compared to those of today. Lets face it, they didn't even wear as much padding so they don't deserve to be included. :rolleyes:

 

Thanks for a logical reply.

Ever hear of any of these teams? The names seem so strange and foreign to me... :rolleyes:

(sigh. Dad was right. "Always the bridesmaid, never the bride.")

 

Pssstttt...The old NFL teams are still around for a reason...

 

*1927 GIANTS 13, Chicago Bears 7

Led by Steve Owen, the Giants finished with an 11-1-1 record, then stunned Red Grange, John Driscoll and the Bears 13-7 at the Polo Grounds. “It was the toughest, roughest football game I ever played in,” Owen was later to say. With the score tied 7-7, the Bears drove to the Giants’ one-yard line, but Owen and Cal Hubbard spearheaded a goal line defense which held the Windy City crew. Hinkey Haines then faked a punt from his own end zone and completed a pass to Charlie Corgan for a 58-yard gain which set up the winning score and elation for Tim Mara.

*Victory clinched the NFL Championship; there was no Championship game played at that time.

1933 Chicago Bears 23, GIANTS 21

Jack Manders opened the scoring for the Bears at Wrigley Field, before 26,000 with a 16-yard field goal in the first period to touch off 60 minutes of fireworks which kept fans standing on their chairs through most of the game. Manders kicked a 28-yard FG for a 6-0 lead in the second period before Harry Newman hit Red Badgro for a touchdown pass and a 7-6 Giant lead at the half. Manders’ third FG regained the lead for the Bears, but Max Krause’s TD and the conversion by Ken Strong put NY back in front 14-9. A pass from Bronko Nagurski to Bill Karr made it 16-14, Chicago, before Strong lateraled to Newman who then threw a TD pass back to Strong for a 21-16 Giant lead late in the game. The Bears bounced back to win, however, when Nagurski’s jump pass to Bill Hewitt was lateraled to Karr for the game-winning touchdown.

1934 GIANTS 30, Chicago Bears 13

With the temperature at nine degrees and the Polo Grounds covered with a sheet of ice, this one became famous as the "sneakers" game when Steve Owen provided his squad with basketball shoes to open the second half with his club trailing 10-3. The Giants responded with four touchdowns which had a crowd of 35,059 roaring approval. The Bears had a string of 33 games without a defeat going into this one, but fell behind 3-0 on a 38-yard FG by Ken Strong. A TD by Nagurski and a field goal by Manders got the Bears in front 10-3 at the half, when Owen sent for the sneakers to take advantage of the slippery footing. Ahead 13-3 on another Manders' FG, the Bears were swamped in a fourth-period Giant uprising which saw Ed Danowski throw a 28-yard TD pass to Ike Frankian and Ken Strong race 42 yards for another TD just moments later for a 17-13 lead. Danowski and Strong raced for subsequent touchdowns against the stunned Bears to turn the game into a rout.

1935 Detroit Lions 26, GIANTS 7

With a crowd of about 15,000 looking on, the Lions took a 13-0 lead in the first period when Leroy "Ace" Gutowsky plunged over from the 2-yard line and Earl "Dutch" Clark shook loose on a 40-yard touchdown romp. The Giants closed the gap at 13-7 in the third period when Danowski connected with Strong for a 42-yard touchdown pass, but the Lions' defense accounted for two more scores in the final period on a blocked punt and intercepted pass. Ernie Caddel scored the first on a 4-yard slant and Buddy Parker the second on a 9-yard run.

1938 GIANTS 23, Green Bay Packers 17

A slam-bang, bruising thriller was staged for the largest crowd (48,120 at the Polo Grounds) to see a championship game up to that time. With the victory, the Giants became the first team to win the championship twice since the divisional splitup. The Giants blocked two punts early in the game, and capitalized on both with Ward Cuff kicking a 13-yard FG and Tuffy Leemans blasting over on a 6-yard plunge. Arnie Herber’s 50-yard TD pass to Carl Mulleneaux got the Packers on the scoreboard, but Danowski hit Hap Barnard for a 20-yard TD pass and a 16-7 lead. The Packers closed to 16-14 at halftime on Clark Hinkle’s 6-yard TD, then took the lead 17-16 on Engebretsen’s third-period FG. New York then stormed back to the Packer 23 from where Danowski passed to Hank Soar for the game-winning TD.

1939 Green Bay Packers 27, GIANTS 0

The Packers came up with sweet revenge in a grudge match played before 32,279 at Milwaukee’s State Fair Grounds. Cold weather and a 35-MPH wind made aerial sorties a bit dubious, but Green Bay scored quickly on a 7-yard pitch from Herber to Milt Gantenbein. Engebretsen kicked a 29-yard FG in the third period for a 10-0 lead, and the Packers wrapped it up with touchdowns by Joe Laws on a 20-yard pass from Cecil Isbell, a one-yard plunge by Jankowski and Ernie Smith’s 42-yard field goal.

1941 Chicago Bears 37, GIANTS 9

Attendance was only 13,341 at Wrigley Field, just two weeks after Pearl Harbor Day. The Giants led 6-3 in the first period on a Tuffy Leemans to George Franck touchdown pass of 31 yards, but the Bears scored on a pair of field goals, then broke the game wide open in the second half on touchdowns by Norm Standlee (2), George McAfee and Ken Kavanaugh.

1944 Green Bay Packers 14, GIANTS 7

The Packers took a 14-0 lead at halftime before 46,016 at the Polo Grounds on touchdowns by Ted Fritsch – the first on a 2-yard plunge and the second on a 26-yard pass from lrv Comp with Don Hutson adding the conversions. Ward Cuff scored on a 1-yard plunge on the first play of the final period for the Giants, but the Packers hung on for the triumph.

1946 Chicago Bears 24, GIANTS 14

Sid Luckman was the big man for the Bears in this win before 58,346 at the Polo Grounds. He passed for a 21-yard TD to Ken Kavanaugh to open the scoring, then ran 19 yards for a score later in the game. Dante Magnani’s 19-yard pass interception accounted for the third Bear score, while the Giants hit the scoring column on touchdown passes from Frank Filchock to Frank Liebel and Steve Filipowicz.

1956 GIANTS 47, Chicago Bears 7

Fullback Mel Triplett smashed 17 yards for a TD early in the game on an icy field before a big crowd, then Ben Agajanian added a brace of field goals for a 13-0 lead. It was 34-7 at halftime as Alex Webster crashed over for a pair of touchdowns from inside the 5-yard line. Charlie Conerly’s aerials brought nothing but more woe to the Bears in the second half, with Kyle Rote snaring a 9-yard TD throw and Frank Gifford a 14-yarder to close out the scoring.

1958 Baltimore Colts 23, GIANTS 17 (OT)

Some people call this the greatest game ever played, and perhaps it was for drama and its sudden-death ending. With a crowd of 64,185 on hand at Yankee Stadium, the Giants led 3-0 on a 36-yard Pat Summerall FG in the first period, with the Colts taking over 14-3 at halftime on scores by Alan Ameche from the 2-yard line and Ray Berry on a 15-yard pitch from Johnny Unitas. The Giants scored in the third period on a 1-yard plunge by Mel Triplett after an 86-yard gainer from Conerly to Rote with Webster picking up Rote’s fumble. The Giants went in front 17-14 on Conerly’s 15-yard TD throw to Gifford, but the Colts tied it with seven seconds to play on Steve Myrah’s 13-yard FG and won in the overtime on Ameche’s 1-yard plunge, the 13th play of a Colt drive.

1959 Baltimore Colts 31, GIANTS 16

A sellout crowd of 57,577 was on hand at Baltimore’s Municipal Stadium for the big rematch of the divisional champions. The home crowd had plenty to cheer about in the early going as Unitas hit Lenny Moore for a 60-yard TD bomb, but the Giants surged back to stop the Colt offense. With Summerall kicking three field goals (23, 26 and 23 yards), the Giants led 9-7 going into the final period. But the Colts stormed back with a furious final period onslaught as Unitas scored on a 4-yard run, threw a 12-yard TD pass to Richardson and Johnny Sample returned an interception for another score.

1961 Green Bay Packers 37, GIANTS 0

With a crowd of 39,029 looking on in Green Bay, Paul Hornung paced the Packers to a stunning 37-0 triumph by scoring 19 points on a touchdown, three field goals and four conversions. On leave from his Army duties in Fort Riley, Kan., Hornung scored on a 6-yard slant in the second period to break a scoreless deadlock and set off a Packer splurge which accounted for 24 points in that quarter. The Giants were unable to recover from this onslaught and suffered their first shutout in nine seasons. Bart Starr’s touchdown pass to Ron Kramer and a pair of Hornung field goals closed out the scoring in the second half.

1962 Green Bay Packers 16, GIANTS 7

Bitter cold weather at Yankee Stadium was no deterrent to 64,892 fans who turned out for the year’s big one. As things turned out, a trio of field goals by Packer guard Jerry Kramer made the difference in a game where both defensive units turned in superlative jobs. The only Giant score was a result of defensive work when Erich Barnes blocked a Max McGee punt and reserve end Jim Collier fell on the ball in the end zone.

1963 Chicago Bears 14, GIANTS 10

The Bear defense turned the tide in this championship game, played in 10-degree weather in Wrigley Field. Taking the early lead on a 14-yard Y.A. Tittle TD pass to Frank Gifford and Don Chandler’s FG, the Giants were the victims of five pass interceptions thereafter, two of which set up the Bear scores. Larry Morris swiped the first one for a return of 61 yards, while Ed O’Bradovich’s steal of a screen pass set up what turned out to be the winning score. Tittle suffered a knee injury in the first half, but gallantly returned to action in the second half, though he was hampered and hobbled by his injury.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't say for sure, but I do suspect that pre-1967 didn't get the media attention it does today. Pro football really only started getting popular in the late '50s and early '60s. I remember a group of us having to drive down to rent a room in Camden, NY because the Giant championship game was blacked out in NY.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because of the merger...That's really why. If it wasn't for the merger and share revenuel agreement, historic teams like the Steelers, Green Bay, Dallas (Who were on the verge of losing their second team to finantual problems) wouldn't be here today. They would suffer the same fate as the Dayton Triangles. Its one of the reason why Willington Mara is a HOF owner. He pretty much created the SB and saved the NFL from desolving.

Thanks for this succinct answer Nem...my home computer unexpectedly died on me so I was unable to supply a quick answer to it. Again the old line teams and owners really fell on their swords for the betterment of the league; if they did not do that the Giants would be the Yankees of pro football. With a couple of west coast powerhouses and one or two strong midwest teams. The rest would be perenial victims.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...